arcgis.features.analysis module

Feature Input

All standard spatial analysis tools accept features as input. Features can be specified in one of the following ways:
  • Item (of type Feature Layer Collection or Feature Collection) - only the first feature layer is used
  • Instance of FeatureLayer, FeatureLayerCollection, FeatureCollection,
  • Feature Service URL as a string,
  • Python dict in the feature collection format
For point feature layers, the following inputs may additonally be used for convenience:
  • (lat, long) pair for point feature layer
  • dict with ‘location’ as key (eg result from geocoding)

All the spatial analysis tools from the analyze_patterns, enrich_data, find_locations, manage_data, summarize_data and use_proximity submodules, in one place for convenience.

aggregate_points

arcgis.features.analysis.aggregate_points(point_layer, polygon_layer, keep_boundaries_with_no_points=True, summary_fields=[], group_by_field=None, minority_majority=False, percent_points=False, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)

The Aggregate Points task works with a layer of point features and a layer of polygon features. It first figures out which points fall within each polygon’s area. After determining this point-in-polygon spatial relationship, statistics about all points in the polygon are calculated and assigned to the area. The most basic statistic is the count of the number of points within the polygon, but you can get other statistics as well. For example, if your points represented coffee shops and each point has a TOTAL_SALES attribute, you can get statistics like the sum of all TOTAL_SALES within the polygon, or the minimum or maximum TOTAL_SALES value, or the standard deviation of all sales within the polygon.

Parameter Description
point_layer Required point layer. The point features that will be aggregated into the polygons in the polygon_layer. See Feature Input.
polygon_layer Required polygon layer. The polygon features (areas) into which the input points will be aggregated. See Feature Input.
keep_boundaries_with_no_points Optional boolean. A Boolean value that specifies whether the polygons that have no points within them should be returned in the output. The default is true.
summary_fields

Optional list of strings. A list of field names and statistical summary type that you wish to calculate for all points within each polygon. Note that the count of points within each polygon is always returned. summary type is one of the following:

  • Sum—Adds the total value of all the points in each polygon
  • Mean—Calculates the average of all the points in each polygon.
  • Min—Finds the smallest value of all the points in each polygon.
  • Max—Finds the largest value of all the points in each polygon.
  • Stddev—Finds the standard deviation of all the points in each polygon.

Example [fieldName1 summaryType1,fieldName2 summaryType2].

group_by_field Optional string. A field name in the point_layer. Points that have the same value for the group by field will have their own counts and summary field statistics. You can create statistical groups using an attribute in the analysis layer. For example, if you are aggregating crimes to neighborhood boundaries, you may have an attribute Crime_type with five different crime types. Each unique crime type forms a group, and the statistics you choose will be calculated for each unique value of Crime_type. When you choose a grouping attribute, two results are created: the result layer and a related table containing the statistics.
minority_majority Optional boolean. This boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If true, the minority (least dominant) or the majority (most dominant) attribute values for each group field within each boundary are calculated. Two new fields are added to the aggregated_layer prefixed with Majority_ and Minority_. The default is false.
percent_points Optional boolean. This boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If set to true, the percentage count of points for each unique group_by_field value is calculated. A new field is added to the group summary output table containing the percentages of each attribute value within each group. If minority_majority is true, two additional fields are added to the aggregated_layer containing the percentages of the minority and majority attribute values within each group.
output_name Optional string. Output Features Name (str). Optional parameter.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For Aggregate Points, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input pointLayer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To find number of permits issued in each zip code of US.

agg_result = aggregate_points(point_layer=permits,
                        polygon_layer=zip_codes,
                        keep_boundaries_with_no_points=False,
                        summary_fields=["DeclValNu mean","DeclValNu2 mean"],
                        group_by_field='Declared_V',
                        minority_majority=True,
                        percent_points=True,
                        output_name="aggregated_permits",
                        context='{"extent":{"xmin":-8609738.077325115,"ymin":4743483.445485223,"xmax":-8594030.268012533,"ymax":4752206.821338257,"spatialReference":{"wkid":102100,"latestWkid":3857}}}') 

calculate_density

arcgis.features.analysis.calculate_density(input_layer, field=None, cell_size=None, cell_size_units='Meters', radius=None, radius_units=None, bounding_polygon_layer=None, area_units=None, classification_type='EqualInterval', num_classes=10, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)

The calculate_density function creates a density map from point or line features by spreading known quantities of some phenomenon (represented as attributes of the points or lines) across the map. The result is a layer of areas classified from least dense to most dense.

For point input, each point should represent the location of some event or incident, and the result layer represents a count of the incident per unit area. A higher density value in a new location means that there are more points near that location. In many cases, the result layer can be interpreted as a risk surface for future events. For example, if the input points represent locations of lightning strikes, the result layer can be interpreted as a risk surface for future lightning strikes.

For line input, the line density surface represents the total amount of line that is near each location. The units of the calculated density values are the length of line per unit area. For example, if the lines represent rivers, the result layer will represent the total length of rivers that are within the search radius. This result can be used to identify areas that are hospitable to grazing animals.

Argument Description
input_layer Required layer. The point or line features from which to calculate density. See Feature Input.
field Optional string. A numeric field name specifying the number of incidents at each location. For example, if you have points that represent cities, you can use a field representing the population of the city as the count field, and the resulting population density layer will calculate larger population densities near cities with larger populations. If not specified, each location will be assumed to represent a single count.
cell_size Optional float. This value is used to create a mesh of points where density values are calculated. The default is approximately 1/1000th of the smaller of the width and height of the analysis extent as defined in the context parameter. The smaller the value, the smoother the polygon boundaries will be. Conversely, with larger values, the polygon boundaries will be more coarse and jagged.
cell_size_units Optional string. The units of the cell_size value. Choice list: [‘Miles’, ‘Feet’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Meters’]
radius Optional float. A distance specifying how far to search to find point or line features when calculating density values.
radius_units Optional string. The units of the radius parameter. If no distance is provided, a default will be calculated that is based on the locations of the input features and the values in the count field (if a count field is provided). Choice list: [‘Miles’, ‘Feet’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Meters’]
bounding_polygon_layer Optional layer. A layer specifying the polygon(s) where you want densities to be calculated. For example, if you are interpolating densities of fish within a lake, you can use the boundary of the lake in this parameter and the output will only draw within the boundary of the lake. See Feature Input.
area_units Optional string. The units of the calculated density values. Choice list: [‘areaUnits’, ‘SquareMiles’]
classification_type

Optional string. Determines how density values will be classified into polygons. Choice list: [‘EqualInterval’, ‘GeometricInterval’, ‘NaturalBreaks’, ‘EqualArea’, ‘StandardDeviation’]

  • EqualInterval—Polygons are created such that the range of density values is equal for each area.
  • GeometricInterval—Polygons are based on class intervals that have a geometric series. This method ensures that each class range has approximately the same number of values within each class and that the change between intervals is consistent.
  • NaturalBreaks—Class intervals for polygons are based on natural groupings of the data. Class break values are identified that best group similar values and that maximize the differences between classes.
  • EqualArea—Polygons are created such that the size of each area is equal. For example, if the result has more high density values than low density values, more polygons will be created for high densities.
  • StandardDeviation—Polygons are created based upon the standard deviation of the predicted density values.
num_classes Optional int. This value is used to divide the range of predicted values into distinct classes. The range of values in each class is determined by the classification_type parameter.
output_name Optional string. Additional properties such as output feature service name.
context

Optional string. Additional settings such as processing extent and output spatial reference. For calculate_density, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. Is true, the number of credits needed to run the operation will be returned as a float.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To create a layer that shows density of collisions within 2 miles.       
               The density is classified based upon the standard deviation.
               The range of density values is divided into 5 classes.   
        
collision_density = calculate_density(input_layer=collisions,   
                                radius=2,       
                                radius_units='Miles',   
                                bounding_polygon_layer=zoning_lyr,      
                                area_units='SquareMiles',       
                                classification_type='StandardDeviation',        
                                num_classes=5,  
                                output_name='density_of_incidents')

connect_origins_to_destinations

arcgis.features.analysis.connect_origins_to_destinations(origins_layer, destinations_layer, measurement_type='DrivingTime', origins_layer_route_id_field=None, destinations_layer_route_id_field=None, time_of_day=None, time_zone_for_time_of_day='GeoLocal', output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, point_barrier_layer=None, line_barrier_layer=None, polygon_barrier_layer=None)

The Connect Origins to Destinations task measures the travel time or distance between pairs of points. Using this tool, you can

  • Calculate the total distance or time commuters travel on their home-to-work trips.
  • Measure how far customers are traveling to shop at your stores. Use this information to define your market reach, especially when targeting advertising campaigns or choosing new store locations.
  • Calculate the expected trip mileage for your fleet of vehicles. Afterward, run the Summarize Within tool to report mileage by state or other region.

You provide starting and ending points, and the tool returns a layer containing route lines, including measurements, between the paired origins and destinations.

Argument Description
origins_layer Required layer. The starting point or points of the routes to be generated. See Feature Input.
destinations_layer Required layer. The routes end at points in the destinations layer. See Feature Input.
measurement_type

Required string. The origins and destinations can be connected by measuring straight-line distance, or by measuring travel time or travel distance along a street network using various modes of transportation known as travel modes.

Valid values are a string, StraightLine, which indicates Euclidean distance to be used as distance measure or a Python dictionary representing settings for a travel mode.

When using a travel mode for the measurement_type, you need to specify a dictionary containing the settings for a travel mode supported by your organization. The code in the example section below generates a valid Python dictionary and then passes it as the value for the measurement_type parameter.

Supported travel modes: [‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time’, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

origins_layer_route_id_field

Optional string. Specify the field in the origins layer containing the IDs that pair origins with destinations.

  • The ID values must uniquely identify points in the origins layer.
  • Each ID value must also correspond with exactly one route ID value in the destinations layer. Route IDs that match across the layers create origin-destination pairs, which the tool connects together.
  • Specifying origins_layer_route_id_field is optional when there is exactly one point feature in the origins or destinations layer. The tool will connect all origins to the one destination or the one origin to all destinations, depending on which layer contains one point.
destinations_layer_route_id_field

Optional string. Specify the field in the destinations layer containing the IDs that pair origins with destinations.

  • The ID values must uniquely identify points in the destinations layer.
  • Each ID value must also correspond with exactly one route ID value in the origins layer. Route IDs that match across the layers create origin-destination pairs, which the tool connects together.
  • Specifying destinations_layer_route_id_field is optional when there is exactly one point feature in the origins or destinations layer. The tool will connect all origins to the one destination or the one origin to all destinations, depending on which layer contains one point.
time_of_day

Optional datetime.datetime. Specify whether travel times should consider traffic conditions. To use traffic in the analysis, set measurement_type to a travel mode object whose impedance_attribute_name property is set to travel_time and assign a value to time_of_day. (A travel mode with other impedance_attribute_name values don’t support traffic.) The time_of_day value represents the time at which travel begins, or departs, from the origin points. The time is specified as datetime.datetime.

The service supports two kinds of traffic: typical and live. Typical traffic references travel speeds that are made up of historical averages for each five-minute interval spanning a week. Live traffic retrieves speeds from a traffic feed that processes phone probe records, sensors, and other data sources to record actual travel speeds and predict speeds for the near future.

The data coverage page shows the countries Esri currently provides traffic data for.

Typical Traffic:

To ensure the task uses typical traffic in locations where it is available, choose a time and day of the week, and then convert the day of the week to one of the following dates from 1990:

  • Monday—1/1/1990
  • Tuesday—1/2/1990
  • Wednesday—1/3/1990
  • Thursday—1/4/1990
  • Friday—1/5/1990
  • Saturday—1/6/1990
  • Sunday—1/7/1990

Set the time and date as datetime.datetime.

For example, to solve for 1:03 p.m. on Thursdays, set the time and date to 1:03 p.m., 4 January 1990; and convert to datetime eg. datetime.datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3).

Live Traffic:

To use live traffic when and where it is available, choose a time and date and convert to datetime.

Esri saves live traffic data for 12 hours and references predictive data extending 12 hours into the future. If the time and date you specify for this parameter is outside the 24-hour time window, or the travel time in the analysis continues past the predictive data window, the task falls back to typical traffic speeds.

Examples: from datetime import datetime

  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3) # 13:03, 4 January 1990. Typical traffic on Thursdays at 1:03 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 7, 17, 0) # 17:00, 7 January 1990. Typical traffic on Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2014, 10, 22, 8, 0) # 8:00, 22 October 2014. If the current time is between 8:00 p.m., 21 Oct. 2014 and 8:00 p.m., 22 Oct. 2014, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2015, 3, 18, 10, 20) # 10:20, 18 March 2015. If the current time is between 10:20 p.m., 17 Mar. 2015 and 10:20 p.m., 18 Mar. 2015, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
time_zone_for_time_of_day

Optional string. Specify the time zone or zones of the timeOfDay parameter. Choice list: [‘GeoLocal’, ‘UTC’]

GeoLocal-refers to the time zone in which the originsLayer points are located.

UTC-refers to Coordinated Universal Time.

include_route_layers

Optional Boolean. When include_route_layers is set to True, each route from the result is also saved as a route layer item. A route layer includes all the information for a particular route such as the stops assigned to the route as well as the travel directions. Creating route layers is useful if you want to share individual routes with other members in your organization. The route layers use the output feature service name provided in the outputName parameter as a prefix and the route name generated as part of the analysis is added to create a unique name for each route layer.

Caution: Route layers cannot be created when the output is a feature collection. The task will raise an error if output_name is not specified (which indicates feature collection output) and include_route_layers is True.

The maximum number of route layers that can be created is 1,000. If the result contains more than 1,000 routes and include_route_layers is True, the task will only create the output feature service.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature layer of the results. You define the name of the layer. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Additional settings such as processing extent and output spatial reference. For calculate_density, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the origins_layer and destinations_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)-If the output is a feature service, the spatial reference will be the same as originsLayer. Setting outSR for feature services has no effect. If the output is a feature collection, the features will be in the spatial reference of the outSRvalue or the spatial reference of originsLayer when outSR is not specified.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. Is True, the number of credits needed to run the operation will be returned as a float.
point_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more point features that act as temporary restrictions (in other words, barriers) when traveling on the underlying streets.

A point barrier can model a fallen tree, an accident, a downed electrical line, or anything that completely blocks traffic at a specific position along the street. Travel is permitted on the street but not through the barrier. See Feature Input.

line_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more line features that prohibit travel anywhere the lines intersect the streets.

A line barrier prohibits travel anywhere the barrier intersects the streets. For example, a parade or protest that blocks traffic across several street segments can be modeled with a line barrier. See Feature Input.

polygon_barrier_layer

Optional string. Specify one or more polygon features that completely restrict travel on the streets intersected by the polygons.

One use of this type of barrier is to model floods covering areas of the street network and making road travel there impossible. See Feature Input.

Returns:dict with the following keys:

”routes_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”unassigned_origins_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”unassigned_destinations_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

USAGE EXAMPLE: To retrieve trvel modes and run connect_origins_to_destinations tool.

This example creates route between esri regional offices to esri headquarter.

import arcgis.network as network
route_service = network.RouteLayer(gis.properties.helperServices.route.url, gis=gis)
travel_mode = [i for i in route_service.retrieve_travel_modes()['supportedTravelModes']
    if i['name'] == 'Rural Driving Distance'][0]
routes =  connect_origins_to_destinations(origins_layer=esri_regional,
                                 destinations_layer=dest_layer,
                                 measurement_type=travel_mode,
                                 time_of_day=datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3),
                                 output_name="routes_from_offices_to_hq")

create_buffers

arcgis.features.analysis.create_buffers(input_layer, distances=[], field=None, units='Meters', dissolve_type='None', ring_type='Disks', side_type='Full', end_type='Round', output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/create_buffers.png

The create_buffers task creates polygons that cover a given distance from a point, line, or polygon feature. Buffers are typically used to create areas that can be further analyzed using a tool such as overlay_layers. For example, if the question is “What buildings are within one mile of the school?”, the answer can be found by creating a one-mile buffer around the school and overlaying the buffer with the layer containing building footprints. The end result is a layer of those buildings within one mile of the school.

Parameter Description
input_layer Required point, line or polygon feature layer. The input features to be buffered. See Feature Input.
distances Optional list of floats to buffer the input features. The distance(s) that will be buffered. You must supply values for either the distances or field parameter. You can enter a single distance value or multiple values. The units of the distance values is suppied by the units parameter.
field Optional string. A field on the input_layer containing a buffer distance. Buffers will be created using field values. Unlike the distances parameter, multiple distances are not supported on field input.
units

Optional string. The linear unit to be used with the distance value(s) specified in distances or contained in the field value.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘NauticalMiles’, ‘Yards’]

The default is ‘Meters’.

dissolve_type

Optional string. Determines how overlapping buffers are processed.

Choice list: [‘None’, ‘Dissolve’]

None None—Overlapping areas are kept. This is the default.
Dissolve Dissolve—Overlapping areas are combined.
ring_type

Optional string. Determines how multiple-distance buffers are processed.

Choice list: [‘Disks’, ‘Rings’]

Disks Disks—buffers are concentric and will overlap. For example, if your distances are 10 and 14, the result will be two buffers, one from 0 to 10 and one from 0 to 14. This is the default.
Rings Rings—buffers will not overlap. For example, if your distances are 10 and 14, the result will be two buffers, one from 0 to 10 and one from 10 to 14.
side_type

Optional string. When buffering line features, you can choose which side of the line to buffer.

Typically, you choose both sides (Full, which is the default). Left and right are determined as if you were walking from the first x,y coordinate of the line (the start coordinate) to the last x,y coordinate of the line (the end coordinate). Choosing left or right usually means you know that your line features were created and stored in a particular direction (for example, upstream or downstream in a river network).

When buffering polygon features, you can choose whether the buffer includes or excludes the polygon being buffered.

Choice list: [‘Full’, ‘Left’, ‘Right’, ‘Outside’]

Full Full—both sides of the line will be buffered. This is the default for line featuress.
Left Left—only the right side of the line will be buffered.
Right Right—only the right side of the line will be buffered.
Outside Outside—when buffering a polygon, the polygon being buffered is excluded in the result buffer.
Unspecified If side_type not supplied, the polygon being buffered is included in the result buffer. This is the default for polygon features.
end_type

Optional string. The shape of the buffer at the end of line input features. This parameter is not valid for polygon input features. At the ends of lines the buffer can be rounded (Round) or be straight across (Flat).

Choice list: [‘Round’, ‘Flat’]

Round Round—buffers will be rounded at the ends of lines. This is the default.
Flat Flat—buffers will be flat at the ends of lines.
output_name Optional string. Output feature service name. If not provided, a feature collection is returned.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For create_buffers, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To create 5 mile buffer around US parks, within the specified extent.

polygon_lyr_buffer = create_buffers(input_layer=parks_lyr,
                         distances=[5],
                         units='Miles',
                         ring_type='Rings',
                         end_type='Flat',
                         output_name='create_buffers',
                         context={"extent":{"xmin":-12555831.656684224,"ymin":5698027.566358956,"xmax":-11835489.102124758,"ymax":6104672.556836072,"spatialReference":{"wkid":102100,"latestWkid":3857}}})

create_drive_time_areas

arcgis.features.analysis.create_drive_time_areas(input_layer, break_values=[5, 10, 15], break_units='Minutes', travel_mode='Driving Time', overlap_policy='Overlap', time_of_day=None, time_zone_for_time_of_day='GeoLocal', output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, point_barrier_layer=None, line_barrier_layer=None, polygon_barrier_layer=None)
_images/create_drive_time_areas.png

The create_drive_time_areas method creates areas that can be reached within a given drive time or drive distance. It can help you answer questions such as:

  • How far can I drive from here in five minutes?
  • What areas are covered within a three-mile drive distance of my stores?
  • What areas are within four minutes of our fire stations?
Parameter Description
input_layer Required point feature layer. The points around which travel areas based on a mode of transportation will be drawn. See Feature Input.
travel_mode

Optional string or dict. Specify the mode of transportation for the analysis.

Choice list: [‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time’, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

The default is ‘Driving Time’.

break_values

Optional list of floats. The size of the polygons to create. The units for break_values is specified with the break_units parameter.

By setting many unique values in the list, polygons of different sizes are generated around each input location.

The default is [5, 10, 15].

break_units

Optional string. The units of the break_values parameter.

To create areas showing how far you can go along roads or walkways within a given time, specify a time unit. Alternatively, specify a distance unit to generate areas bounded by a maximum travel distance.

When the travel_mode is time based, a time unit should be specified for the break_units. When the travel_mode is distance based, a distance unit should be specified for the break_units.

Choice list: [‘Seconds’, ‘Minutes’, Hours’, ‘Feet’, ‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Yards’]

The default is ‘Minutes’.

overlap_policy

Optional string. Determines how overlapping areas are processed.

Choice list: [‘Overlap’, ‘Dissolve’, ‘Split’]

Overlap Overlap-Overlapping areas are kept. This is the default.
Dissolve Dissolve-Overlapping areas are combined by break value. Because the areas are dissolved, use this option when you need to know the areas that can be reached within a given time or distance, but you don’t need to know which input points are nearest.
Split Split-Overlapping areas are split in the middle. Use this option when you need to know the one nearest input location to the covered area.

The default is ‘Overlap’

time_of_day

Optional datetime.datetime. Specify whether travel times should consider traffic conditions. To use traffic in the analysis, set measurement_type to a travel mode object whose impedance_attribute_name property is set to travel_time and assign a value to time_of_day. (A travel mode with other impedance_attribute_name values don’t support traffic.) The time_of_day value represents the time at which travel begins, or departs, from the origin points. The time is specified as datetime.datetime.

The service supports two kinds of traffic: typical and live. Typical traffic references travel speeds that are made up of historical averages for each five-minute interval spanning a week. Live traffic retrieves speeds from a traffic feed that processes phone probe records, sensors, and other data sources to record actual travel speeds and predict speeds for the near future.

The data coverage page shows the countries Esri currently provides traffic data for.

Typical Traffic:

To ensure the task uses typical traffic in locations where it is available, choose a time and day of the week, and then convert the day of the week to one of the following dates from 1990:

  • Monday—1/1/1990
  • Tuesday—1/2/1990
  • Wednesday—1/3/1990
  • Thursday—1/4/1990
  • Friday—1/5/1990
  • Saturday—1/6/1990
  • Sunday—1/7/1990

Set the time and date as datetime.datetime.

For example, to solve for 1:03 p.m. on Thursdays, set the time and date to 1:03 p.m., 4 January 1990; and convert to datetime eg. datetime.datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3).

Live Traffic:

To use live traffic when and where it is available, choose a time and date and convert to datetime.

Esri saves live traffic data for 12 hours and references predictive data extending 12 hours into the future. If the time and date you specify for this parameter is outside the 24-hour time window, or the travel time in the analysis continues past the predictive data window, the task falls back to typical traffic speeds.

Examples: from datetime import datetime

  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3) # 13:03, 4 January 1990. Typical traffic on Thursdays at 1:03 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 7, 17, 0) # 17:00, 7 January 1990. Typical traffic on Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2014, 10, 22, 8, 0) # 8:00, 22 October 2014. If the current time is between 8:00 p.m., 21 Oct. 2014 and 8:00 p.m., 22 Oct. 2014, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2015, 3, 18, 10, 20) # 10:20, 18 March 2015. If the current time is between 10:20 p.m., 17 Mar. 2015 and 10:20 p.m., 18 Mar. 2015, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
time_zone_for_time_of_day

Optional string. Specify the time zone or zones of the time_of_day parameter.

Choice list: [‘GeoLocal’, ‘UTC’]

GeoLocal-refers to the time zone in which the originsLayer points are located.

UTC-refers to Coordinated Universal Time.

The default is ‘GeoLocal’.

output_name Optional string. Output feature service name. If not provided, a feature collection is returned.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For create_drive_time_areas, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.
point_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more point features that act as temporary restrictions (in other words, barriers) when traveling on the underlying streets.

A point barrier can model a fallen tree, an accident, a downed electrical line, or anything that completely blocks traffic at a specific position along the street. Travel is permitted on the street but not through the barrier. See Feature Input.

line_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more line features that prohibit travel anywhere the lines intersect the streets.

A line barrier prohibits travel anywhere the barrier intersects the streets. For example, a parade or protest that blocks traffic across several street segments can be modeled with a line barrier. See Feature Input.

polygon_barrier_layer

Optional string. Specify one or more polygon features that completely restrict travel on the streets intersected by the polygons.

One use of this type of barrier is to model floods covering areas of the street network and making road travel there impossible. See Feature Input.

Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To create drive time areas around USA airports, within the specified extent.

target_area4 = create_drive_time_areas(airport_lyr,
                               break_values=[2, 4],
                               break_units='Hours',
                               travel_mode='Trucking Time',
                               overlap_policy='Split',  
                               time_of_day=datetime(2019, 5, 13, 7, 52),
                               output_name='create_drive_time_areas',
                               context={"extent":{"xmin":-11134400.655784884,"ymin":3368261.7800108367,"xmax":-10682810.692676282,"ymax":3630899.409198575,"spatialReference":{"wkid":102100,"latestWkid":3857}}}) 

create_route_layers

arcgis.features.analysis.create_route_layers(route_data_item, delete_route_data_item=False, tags=None, summary=None, route_name_prefix=None, folder_name=None, gis=None, estimate=False)

The create_route_layers method creates route layer items on the portal from the input route data.

A route layer includes all the information for a particular route such as the stops assigned to the route as well as the travel directions. Creating route layers is useful if you want to share individual routes with other members in your organization.

Parameter Description
route_data Required item. The item id for the route data item that is used to create route layer items. Before running this task, the route data must be added to your portal as an item.
delete_route_data_item

Required boolean. Indicates if the input route data item should be deleted. You may want to delete the route data in case it is no longer required after the route layers have been created from it.

When delete_route_data_item is set to true and the task fails to delete the route data item, it will return a warning message but still continue execution.

The default value is False.

tags Optional string. Tags used to describe and identify the route layer items. Individual tags are separated using a comma. The route name is always added as a tag even when a value for this argument is not specified.
summary Optional string. The summary displayed as part of the item information for the route layer item. If a value for this argument is not specified, a default summary text “Route and directions for <Route Name>” is used.
route_name_prefix Optional string. A qualifier added to the title of every route layer item. This can be used to designate all routes that are shared for a specific purpose to have the same prefix in the title. The name of the route is always appended after this qualifier. If a value for the route_name_prefix is not specified, the title for the route layer item is created using only the route name.
folder_name Optional string. The folder within your personal online workspace (My Content in your ArcGIS Online or Portal for ArcGIS organization) where the route layer items will be created. If a folder with the specified name does not exist, a new folder will be created. If a folder with the specified name exists, the items will be created in the existing folder. If a value for folder_name is not specified, the route layer items are created in the root folder of your online workspace.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : list (items)
USAGE EXAMPLE: To create route layers from geodatabase item.
route = create_route_layers(route_data_item=route_item,
                    delete_route_data_item=False,
                    tags="datascience",
                    summary="example of create route layers method",
                    route_name_prefix="santa_ana",
                    folder_name="create route layers")        

create_viewshed

arcgis.features.analysis.create_viewshed(input_layer, dem_resolution='Finest', maximum_distance=None, max_distance_units='Meters', observer_height=None, observer_height_units='Meters', target_height=None, target_height_units='Meters', generalize=True, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/create_viewshed.png

The create_viewshed method identifies visible areas based on the observer locations you provide. The results are areas where the observers can see the observed objects (and the observed objects can see the observers).

Parameter Description
input_layer Required point feature layer. The features to use as the observer locations. See Feature Input.
dem_resolution

Optional string. The approximate spatial resolution (cell size) of the source elevation data used for the calculation.

The resolution values are an approximation of the spatial resolution of the digital elevation model. While many elevation sources are distributed in units of arc seconds, the keyword is an approximation of those resolutions in meters for easier understanding.

Choice list: [‘FINEST’, ‘10m’, ‘24m’, ‘30m’, ‘90m’]

The default is the finest resolution available.

maximum_distance

Optional float. This is a cutoff distance where the computation of visible areas stops. Beyond this distance, it is unknown whether the analysis points and the other objects can see each other.

It is useful for modeling current weather conditions or a given time of day, such as dusk. Large values increase computation time.

Unless specified, a default maximum distance will be computed based on the resolution and extent of the source DEM. The allowed maximum value is 50 kilometers. Use max_distance_units to set the units for maximum_distance.

max_distance_units

Optional string. The units for the maximum_distance parameter.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Yards’]

The default is ‘Meters’.

observer_height

Optional float. This is the height above the ground of the observer locations.

The default is 1.75 meters, which is approximately the average height of a person. If you are looking from an elevated location, such as an observation tower or a tall building, use that height instead.

Use observer_height_units to set the units for observer_height.

observer_height_units

Optional string. The units for the observer_height parameter.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Yards’]

The default is ‘Meters’.

target_height

Optional float. This is the height of structures or people on the ground used to establish visibility. The result viewshed are those areas where an input point can see these other objects. The converse is also true; the other objects can see an input point.

  • If your input points represent wind turbines and you want to determine where people standing on the ground can see the turbines, enter the average height of a person (approximately 6 feet). The result is those areas where a person standing on the ground can see the wind turbines.
  • If your input points represent fire lookout towers and you want to determine which lookout towers can see a smoke plume 20 feet high or higher, enter 20 feet for the height. The result is those areas where a fire lookout tower can see a smoke plume at least 20 feet high.
  • If your input points represent scenic overlooks along roads and trails and you want to determine where wind turbines 400 feet high or higher can be seen, enter 400 feet for the height. The result is those areas where a person standing at a scenic overlook can see a wind turbine at least 400 feet high.
  • If your input points represent scenic overlooks and you want to determine how much area on the ground people standing at the overlook can see, enter zero. The result is those areas that can be seen from the scenic overlook.

Use target_height_units to set the units for target_height.

target_height_units

Optional string. The units for the target_height parameter.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Yards’]

The default is ‘Meters’.

generalize

Optional boolean. Determines whether or not the viewshed polygons are to be generalized.

The viewshed calculation is based on a raster elevation model that creates a result with stair-stepped edges. To create a more pleasing appearance and improve performance, the default behavior is to generalize the polygons. The generalization process smooths the boundary of the visible areas and may remove some single-cell visible areas.

The default value is True.

output_name Optional string. Output feature service name. If not provided, a feature collection is returned.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For create_viewshed, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.

:returns result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.

USAGE EXAMPLE: To create viewshed around esri headquarter office.

viewshed3 = create_viewshed(hq_lyr,
                    maximum_distance=9,
                    max_distance_units='Miles',
                    target_height=6,
                    target_height_units='Feet',
                    output_name="create Viewshed")

create_watersheds

arcgis.features.analysis.create_watersheds(input_layer, search_distance=None, search_units='Meters', source_database='FINEST', generalize=True, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/create_watersheds.png

The create_watersheds method determines the watershed, or upstream contributing area, for each point in your analysis layer. For example, suppose you have point features representing locations of waterborne contamination, and you want to find the likely sources of the contamination. Since the source of the contamination must be somewhere within the watershed upstream of the point, you would use this tool to define the watersheds containing the sources of the contaminant.

Parameter Description
input_layer Required point feature layer. The point features used for calculating watersheds. These are referred to as pour points, because it is the location at which water pours out of the watershed. See Feature Input.
search_distance

Optional float. The maximum distance to move the location of an input point. Use search_units to set the units for search_distance.

If your input points are located away from a drainage line, the resulting watersheds are likely to be very small and not of much use in determining the upstream source of contamination. In most cases, you want your input points to snap to the nearest drainage line in order to find the watersheds that flows to a point located on the drainage line. To find the closest drainage line, specify a search distance. If you do not specify a search distance, the tool will compute and use a conservative search distance.

To use the exact location of your input point, specify a search distance of zero.

For analysis purposes, drainage lines have been precomputed by Esri using standard hydrologic models. If there is no drainage line within the search distance, the location containing the highest flow accumulation within the search distance is used.

search_units

Optional string. The linear units specified for the search distance.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Yards’]

source_database

Optional string. Keyword indicating the data source resolution that will be used in the analysis.

Choice list: [‘Finest’, ‘30m’, ‘90m’]

  • Finest (Default): Finest resolution available at each location from all possible data sources.
  • 30m: The hydrologic source was built from 1 arc second - approximately 30 meter resolution, elevation data.
  • 90m: The hydrologic source was built from 3 arc second - approximately 90 meter resolution, elevation data.
generalize

Optional boolean. Determines if the output watersheds will be smoothed into simpler shapes or conform to the cell edges of the original DEM.

  • True: The polygons will be smoothed into simpler shapes. This is the default.
  • False: The edge of the polygons will conform to the edges of the original DEM.

The default value is True.

output_name Optional string. Output feature service name. If not provided, a feature collection is returned.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For create_watersheds, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.

:returns result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.

USAGE EXAMPLE: To create watersheds for Chennai lakes.    

lakes_watershed = create_watersheds(lakes_lyr,
                                    search_distance=3,
                                    search_units='Kilometers',
                                    source_database='90m',
                                    output_name='create watersheds')

derive_new_locations

arcgis.features.analysis.derive_new_locations(input_layers=[], expressions=[], output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/derive_new_locations.png

The derive_new_locations method derives new features from the input layers that meet a query you specify. A query is made up of one or more expressions. There are two types of expressions: attribute and spatial. An example of an attribute expression is that a parcel must be vacant, which is an attribute of the Parcels layer (STATUS = ‘VACANT’). An example of a spatial expression is that the parcel must also be within a certain distance of a river (Parcels within a distance of 0.75 Miles from Rivers).

The derive_new_locations method is very similar to the find_existing_locations method, the main difference is that the result of derive_new_locations can contain partial features.

  • In both methods, the attribute expression where and the spatial relationships within and contains return the same result. This is because these relationships return entire features.
  • When intersects or within_distance is used, derive_new_locations creates new features in the result. For example, when intersecting a parcel feature and a flood zone area that partially overlap each other, find_existing_locations will return the entire parcel whereas derive_new_locations will return just the portion of the parcel that is within the flood zone.
Argument Description
input_layers

Required list of feature layers. A list of layers that will be used in the expressions parameter. Each layer in the list can be:

  • a feature service layer with an optional filter to select specific features, or
  • a feature collection
expressions

Required dict. There are two types of expressions, attribute and spatial.

Example attribute expression:

{
“operator”: “and”, “layer”: 0, “where”: “STATUS = ‘VACANT’”

}

Note * operator can be either and or or * layer is the index of the layer in the input_layers parameter. * The where clause must be surrounded by double quotes. * When dealing with text fields, values must be single-quoted (‘VACANT’). * Date fields support all queries except LIKE. Dates are strings in YYYY:MM:DD hh:mm:ss format. Here’s an example using the date field ObsDate:

“where”: “ObsDate >= ‘1998-04-30 13:30:00’ “
= Equal
> Greater than
< Less than
>= Greater than or equal to
<= Less than or equal to
<> Not equal
LIKE ‘% <string>’ A percent symbol (%) signifies a wildcard, meaning that anything is acceptable in its place—one character, a hundred characters, or no character. This expression would select Mississippi and Missouri among USA state names: STATE_NAME LIKE ‘Miss%’
BETWEEN <value1> AND <value2>

Selects a record if it has a value greater than or equal to <value1> and less than or equal to <value2>. For example, this expression selects all records with an HHSIZE value greater than or equal to 3 and less than or equal to 10:

HHSIZE BETWEEN 3 AND 10

The above is equivalent to:

HHSIZE >= 3 AND HHSIZE <= 10 This operator applies to numeric or date fields. Here is an example of a date query on the field ObsDate:

ObsDate BETWEEN ‘1998-04-30 00:00:00’ AND ‘1998-04-30 23:59:59’

Time is optional.

NOT BETWEEN <value1> AND <value2>

Selects a record if it has a value outside the range between <value1> and less than or equal to <value2>. For example, this expression selects all records whose HHSIZE value is less than 5 and greater than 7.

HHSIZE NOT BETWEEN 5 AND 7

The above is equivalent to:

HHSIZE < 5 OR HHSIZE > 7 This operator applies to numeric or date fields.

Note

You can use the contains relationship with points and lines. For example, you have a layer of street centerlines (lines) and a layer of manhole covers (points), and you want to find streets that contain a manhole cover. You could use contains to find streets that contain manhole covers, but in order for a line to contain a point, the point must be exactly on the line (that is, in GIS terms, they are snapped to each other). If there is any doubt about this, use the withinDistance relationship with a suitable distance value.

Example spatial expression: {

“operator”: “and”, “layer”: 0, “spatialRel”: “withinDistance”, “selectingLayer”: 1, “distance”: 10, “units”: “miles”

}

  • operator can be either and or or
  • layer is the index of the layer in the input_layers parameter. The result of the expression is features in this layer.
  • spatialRel is the spatial relationship. There are nine spatial relationships.
  • distance is the distance to use for the withinDistance and notWithinDistance spatial relationship.
  • units is the units for distance.
spatialRel Description

intersects

notIntersects

intersect

A feature in layer passes the intersect test if it overlaps any part of a feature in selectingLayer, including touches (where features share a common point).

  • intersects—If a feature in layer intersects a feature in selectingLayer, the portion of the feature in layer that intersects the feature in selectingLayer is included in the output.
  • notIntersects—If a feature in layer intersects a feature in selectingLayer, the portion of the feature in layer that intersects the feature in selectingLayer is excluded from the output.

withinDistance

notWithinDistance

distance

The within a distance relationship uses the straight-line distance between features in layer to those in selectingLayer. withinDistance—The portion of the feature in layer that is within the specified distance of a feature in selectingLayer is included in the output. notWithinDistance—The portion of the feature in layer that is within the specified distance of a feature in selectingLayer is excluded from output. You can think of this relationship as “is farther away than”.

contains

notContains

intersect

A feature in layer passes this test if it completely surrounds a feature in selectingLayer. No portion of the containing feature; however, the contained feature is allowed to touch the containing feature (that is, share a common point along its boundary).

contains—If a feature in layer contains a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is included in the output. notContains—If a feature in layer contains a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in the first layer is excluded

within

notWithin

within

A feature in layer passes this test if it is completely surrounded by a feature in selectingLayer. The entire feature layer must be within the containing feature; however, the two features are allowed to touch (that is, share a common point along its boundary).

  • within—If a feature in layer is completely within a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is included in the output.
  • notWithin—If a feature in layer is completely within a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is excluded from the output.

Note:

can use the within relationship for points and lines, just as you can with the contains relationship. For example, your first layer contains points representing manhole covers and you want to find the manholes that are on street centerlines (as opposed to parking lots or other non-street features). You could use within to find manhole points within street centerlines, but in order for a point to contain a line, the point must be exactly on the line (that is, in GIS terms, they are snapped to each other). If there is any doubt about this, use the withinDistance relationship with a suitable distance value.

nearest

nearest

feature in the first layer passes this test if it is nearest to a feature in the second layer.

  • nearest—If a feature in the first layer is nearest to a feature in the second layer, the feature in the first layer is included in the output.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature layer of the results. You define the name of the layer. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Additional settings such as processing extent and output spatial reference. For derive_new_locations, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layers that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. Is true, the number of credits needed to run the operation will be returned as a float.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To Identify areas that are suitable cougar habitat using the criteria defined by experts. 
 
new_loaction = derive_new_locations(input_layers=[slope, vegetation, streams, highways],
                            expressions=[{"operator":"","layer":0,"selectingLayer":1,"spatialRel":"intersects"},
                                         {"operator":"and","layer":0,"selectingLayer":2,"spatialRel":"withinDistance","distance":500,"units":"Feet"},
                                         {"operator":"and","layer":0,"selectingLayer":3,"spatialRel":"notWithinDistance","distance":1500,"units":"Feet"},
                                         {"operator":"and","layer":0,"where":"GRIDCODE = 1"}],
                            output_name='derive_new_loactions') 

dissolve_boundaries

arcgis.features.analysis.dissolve_boundaries(input_layer, dissolve_fields=[], summary_fields=[], output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, multi_part_features=True)
_images/dissolve_boundaries.png

The dissolve_boundaries method finds polygons that overlap or share a common boundary and merges them together to form a single polygon.

You can control which boundaries are merged by specifying a field. For example, if you have a layer of counties, and each county has a State_Name attribute, you can dissolve boundaries using the State_Name attribute. Adjacent counties will be merged together if they have the same value for State_Name. The end result is a layer of state boundaries.

Parameter Description
input_layer Required layer. The layer containing polygon features that will be dissolved. See Feature Input.
dissolve_fields

Optional list of strings. One or more fields on the input_layer that control which polygons are merged. If you don’t supply dissolve_fields , or you supply an empty list of fields, polygons that share a common border (that is, they are adjacent) or polygon areas that overlap will be dissolved into one polygon.

If you do supply values for the dissolve_fields parameter, polygons that share a common border and contain the same value in one or more fields will be dissolved. For example, if you have a layer of counties, and each county has a State_Name attribute, you can dissolve boundaries using the State_Name attribute. Adjacent counties will be merged together if they have the same value for State_Name. The end result is a layer of state boundaries.If two or more fields are specified, the values in these fields must be the same for the boundary to be dissolved.

summary_fields

Optional list of strings. A list of field names and statistical summary type that you wish to calculate from the polygons that are dissolved together. For example, if you are dissolving counties based on State_Name, and each county had a Population field, you can sum Population. The result would be a layer of state boundaries with total population.

fieldName is the name of one of the numeric fields found in the input_layer. summary type is one of the following:

  • Sum—Adds the total value of all the points in each polygon
  • Mean—Calculates the average of all the points in each polygon.
  • Min—Finds the smallest value of all the points in each polygon.
  • Max—Finds the largest value of all the points in each polygon.
  • Stddev—Finds the standard deviation of all the points in each polygon.

Example [fieldName1 summaryType1,fieldName2 summaryType2].

output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For dissolve_boundaries Points, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
multi_part_features

Optional boolean. Specifies whether multipart features (i.e. features which share a common attribute table but are not visibly connected) are allowed in the output feature class.

Choice list: [‘True’, ‘False’].

True: Specifies multipart features are allowed.

False: Specifies multipart features are not allowed. Instead of creating multipart features, individual features will be created for each part.

The default value is True.

Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To dissolve boundaries of polygons with same state name. The dissolved polygons are summarized using population as summary field and standard deviation as summary type.
diss_counties = dissolve_boundaries(input_layer=usa_counties,
                                    dissolve_fields=["STATE_NAME"],
                                    summary_fields=["POPULATION STDDEV"],
                                    output_name="DissolveBoundaries")    

enrich_layer

arcgis.features.analysis.enrich_layer(input_layer, data_collections=[], analysis_variables=[], country=None, buffer_type=None, distance=None, units=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, return_boundaries=False)
_images/enrich_layer.png

The enrich_layer method enriches your data by getting facts about the people, places, and businesses that surround your data locations. For example: What kind of people live here? What do people like to do in this area? What are their habits and lifestyles? What kind of businesses are there in this area?

The result will be a new layer of input features that includes all demographic and geographic information from given data collections.

Parameter Description
input_layer Required layer. The features to enrich with new data. See Feature Input.
data_collections

Optional list of strings. This optional parameter defines the collections of data you want to use to enrich your features. Its value is a list of strings. If you don’t provide this parameter, you must provide the analysis_variables parameter.

For more information about data collections and the values for this parameter, visit the Esri Demographics site.

analysis_variables

Optional list of strings. The parameter defines the specific variables within a data collection you want to use to your features. Its value is a list of strings in the form of “dataCollection.VariableName”. If you don’t provide this parameter, you must provide the dataCollections parameter. You can provide both parameters. For example, if you want all variables in the KeyGlobalFacts data collection, specify it in the dataCollections parameter and use this parameter for specific variables in other collections.

For more information about variables in data collections, visit the Esri Demographics site. Each data collection has a PDF file describing variables and their names.

country

Optional string. This optional parameter further defines what is returned from data collection. For example, your input features may be countries in Western Europe, and you want to enrich them with the KeyWEFacts data collection. However, you only want data for France, not every country in your input layer. The value is the two-character country code.

For more information about data collections and the values for this parameter, visit the Esri Demographics site.

buffer_type (Required if input_layer contains point or line features)

Optional string. If your input features are points or lines, you must define an area around your features that you want to enrich. Features that are within (or equal to) the distances you enter will be enriched.

Choice list: [‘StraightLine’, ‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time ‘, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

distance (Required if input_layer contains point or line features) Optional float. A value that defines the search distance or time. The units of the distance value is supplied by the units parameter.
units

Optional string. The linear unit to be used with the distance value(s) specified in the distance parameter.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’, ‘Seconds’, ‘Minutes’. ‘Hours’]

output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For enrich_layer method, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
return_boundaries

Optional boolean. Applies only for point and line input features. If True, a result layer of areas is returned. The returned areas are defined by the specified buffer_type. For example, if using a buffer_type of StraightLine with a distance of 5 miles, your result will contain areas with a 5 mile radius around the input features and requested analysis_variables variables. If False, the resulting layer will return the same features as the input layer with analysis_variables variables.

The default value is False.

:returns result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.

USAGE EXAMPLE: To enrich US block groups with population as analysis variable.
blkgrp_enrich = enrich_layer(block_groups,
                             analysis_variables=["AtRisk.MP27002A_B"],
                             country='US',
                             output_name='enrich layer')

extract_data

arcgis.features.analysis.extract_data(input_layers, extent=None, clip=False, data_format=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/extract_data.png

The extract_data method is used to extract data from one or more layers within a given extent. The extracted data format can be a file geodatabase, shapefiles, csv, or kml. File geodatabases and shapefiles are added to a zip file that can be downloaded.

Argument Description
input_layers Required list of strings. A list of input layers to be extracted. See Feature Input.
extent Optional layer. The extent is the area of interest used to extract the input features. If not specified, all features from each input layer are extracted. See Feature Input.
clip

Optional boolean. A Boolean value that specifies whether the features within the input layer are clipped within the extent. By default, features are not clipped and all features intersecting the extent are returned.

The default is false.

data_format

Optional string. A keyword defining the output data format for your extracted data.

Choice list: [‘FileGeodatabase’, ‘ShapeFile’, ‘KML’, ‘CSV’]

The default is ‘CSV’.

If FILEGEODATABASE is specified, and the input layer has attachments , the attachments will be extracted to the output file geodatabase if clip is false. If clip is true, attachments will not be extracted.

output_name

Optional string or dict. output_name is used to name the item in your My contents page. For more information on these item properties, see the Item resource page in the ArcGIS REST API Syntax when output_name is dict: {

“title”: “<title>”, “tag”: “<tags>”, “snippet”: “<snippet>”, “description”: “<description>” }
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect method execution. For extract_data, there is one setting.

  1. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the extracted features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
# USAGE EXAMPLE: To extract data from highways layer with the extent of a state boundary. 

ext_state_highway = extract_data(input_layers=[highways.layers[0]],
                         extent=state_area_boundary.layers[0],
                         clip=True,
                         data_format='shapefile',
                         output_name='state highway extracted')     

find_existing_locations

arcgis.features.analysis.find_existing_locations(input_layers=None, expressions=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/find_existing_locations.png

The find_existing_locations method selects features in the input layer that meet a query you specify. A query is made up of one or more expressions. There are two types of expressions: attribute and spatial. An example of an attribute expression is that a parcel must be vacant, which is an attribute of the Parcels layer (where STATUS = ‘VACANT’). An example of a spatial expression is that the parcel must also be within a certain distance of a river (Parcels within a distance of 0.75 Miles from Rivers).

Argument Description
input_layers

Required list of feature layers. A list of layers that will be used in the expressions parameter. Each layer in the list can be:

  • a feature service layer with an optional filter to select specific features, or
  • a feature collection

See Feature Input.

expressions

Required dict. There are two types of expressions, attribute and spatial.

Example attribute expression:

{
“operator”: “and”, “layer”: 0, “where”: “STATUS = ‘VACANT’”

}

Note

  • operator can be either and or or
  • layer is the index of the layer in the input_layers parameter.
  • The where clause must be surrounded by double quotes.
  • When dealing with text fields, values must be single-quoted (‘VACANT’).
  • Date fields support all queries except LIKE. Dates are strings in YYYY:MM:DD hh:mm:ss format.

Here’s an example using the date field ObsDate:

“where”: “ObsDate >= ‘1998-04-30 13:30:00’ “

= Equal
> Greater than
< Less than
>= Greater than or equal to
<= Less than or equal to
<> Not equal
LIKE ‘% <string>’ A percent symbol (%) signifies a wildcard, meaning that anything is acceptable in its place—one character, a hundred characters, or no character. This expression would select Mississippi and Missouri among USA state names: STATE_NAME LIKE ‘Miss%’
BETWEEN <value1> AND <value2>

Selects a record if it has a value greater than or equal to <value1> and less than or equal to <value2>. For example, this expression selects all records with an HHSIZE value greater than or equal to 3 and less than or equal to 10:

HHSIZE BETWEEN 3 AND 10

The above is equivalent to:

HHSIZE >= 3 AND HHSIZE <= 10 This operator applies to numeric or date fields. Here is an example of a date query on the field ObsDate:

ObsDate BETWEEN ‘1998-04-30 00:00:00’ AND ‘1998-04-30 23:59:59’

Time is optional.

NOT BETWEEN <value1> AND <value2>

Selects a record if it has a value outside the range between <value1> and less than or equal to <value2>. For example, this expression selects all records whose HHSIZE value is less than 5 and greater than 7.

HHSIZE NOT BETWEEN 5 AND 7

The above is equivalent to:

HHSIZE < 5 OR HHSIZE > 7 This operator applies to numeric or date fields.

Note

You can use the contains relationship with points and lines. For example, you have a layer of street centerlines (lines) and a layer of manhole covers (points), and you want to find streets that contain a manhole cover. You could use contains to find streets that contain manhole covers, but in order for a line to contain a point, the point must be exactly on the line (that is, in GIS terms, they are snapped to each other). If there is any doubt about this, use the withinDistance relationship with a suitable distance value.

Example spatial expression: {

“operator”: “and”, “layer”: 0, “spatialRel”: “withinDistance”, “selectingLayer”: 1, “distance”: 10, “units”: “miles”

}

  • operator can be either and or or
  • layer is the index of the layer in the input_layers parameter. The result of the expression is features in this layer.
  • spatialRel is the spatial relationship. There are nine spatial relationships.
  • distance is the distance to use for the withinDistance and notWithinDistance spatial relationship.
  • units is the units for distance.
spatialRel Description

intersects

notIntersects

intersect

A feature in layer passes the intersect test if it overlaps any part of a feature in selectingLayer, including touches (where features share a common point).

  • intersects—If a feature in layer intersects a feature in selectingLayer, the portion of the feature in layer that intersects the feature in selectingLayer is included in the output.
  • notIntersects—If a feature in layer intersects a feature in selectingLayer, the portion of the feature in layer that intersects the feature in selectingLayer is excluded from the output.

withinDistance

notWithinDistance

distance

The within a distance relationship uses the straight-line distance between features in layer to those in selectingLayer. withinDistance—The portion of the feature in layer that is within the specified distance of a feature in selectingLayer is included in the output. notWithinDistance—The portion of the feature in layer that is within the specified distance of a feature in selectingLayer is excluded from output. You can think of this relationship as “is farther away than”.

contains

notContains

intersect

A feature in layer passes this test if it completely surrounds a feature in selectingLayer. No portion of the containing feature; however, the contained feature is allowed to touch the containing feature (that is, share a common point along its boundary).

contains—If a feature in layer contains a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is included in the output. notContains—If a feature in layer contains a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in the first layer is excluded

within

notWithin

within

A feature in layer passes this test if it is completely surrounded by a feature in selectingLayer. The entire feature layer must be within the containing feature; however, the two features are allowed to touch (that is, share a common point along its boundary).

  • within—If a feature in layer is completely within a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is included in the output.
  • notWithin—If a feature in layer is completely within a feature in selectingLayer, the feature in layer is excluded from the output.

Note:

can use the within relationship for points and lines, just as you can with the contains relationship. For example, your first layer contains points representing manhole covers and you want to find the manholes that are on street centerlines (as opposed to parking lots or other non-street features). You could use within to find manhole points within street centerlines, but in order for a point to contain a line, the point must be exactly on the line (that is, in GIS terms, they are snapped to each other). If there is any doubt about this, use the withinDistance relationship with a suitable distance value.

nearest

nearest

feature in the first layer passes this test if it is nearest to a feature in the second layer.

  • nearest—If a feature in the first layer is nearest to a feature in the second layer, the feature in the first layer is included in the output.
  • distance is the distance to use for the withinDistance and notWithinDistance spatial relationship.
  • units is the units for distance.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’]

An expression may be a list, which denotes a group. The first operator in the group indicates how the group expression is added to the previous expression. Grouping expressions is only necessary when you need to create two or more distinct sets of features from the same layer. One way to think of grouping is that without grouping, you would have to execute find_existing_locations multiple times and merge the results.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature layer of the results. You define the name of the layer. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Additional settings such as processing extent and output spatial reference. For find_existing_locations, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layers that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)-the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. Is true, the number of credits needed to run the operation will be returned as a float.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
#USAGE EXAMPLE: To find busy (where SEGMENT_TY is 1 and where ARTERIAL_C is 1) streets from the existing seattle streets layer.
 
arterial_streets = find_existing_locations(input_layers=[bike_route_streets], 
                expressions=[{"operator":"","layer":0,"where":"SEGMENT_TY = 1"},
                             {"operator":"and","layer":0,"where":"ARTERIAL_C = 1"}],
                               output_name='ArterialStreets')

find_hot_spots

arcgis.features.analysis.find_hot_spots(analysis_layer, analysis_field=None, divided_by_field=None, bounding_polygon_layer=None, aggregation_polygon_layer=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, shape_type=None, cell_size=None, cell_size_unit=None, distance_band=None, distance_band_unit=None)
_images/find_hot_spots.png

The find_hot_spots method analyzes point data (such as crime incidents, traffic accidents, or trees) or field values associated with points or area features (such as the number of people in each census tract or the total sales for retail stores). It finds statistically significant spatial clusters of high values (hot spots) and low values (cold spots). For point data when no field is specified, hot spots are locations with lots of points and cold spots are locations with very few points.

The result map layer shows hot spots in red and cold spots in blue. The darkest red features indicate the strongest clustering of high values or point densities; you can be 99 percent confident that the clustering associated with these features could not be the result of random chance. Similarly, the darkest blue features are associated with the strongest spatial clustering of low values or the lowest point densities. Features that are beige are not part of a statistically significant cluster; the spatial pattern associated with these features could very likely be the result of random processes and random chance.

Argument Description
analysis_layer (Required if the analysis_layer contains polygons) Required layer. The point or polygon feature layer for which hot spots will be calculated. See Feature Input.
analysis_field

Optional string. The numeric field that will be analyzed. The field you select might represent:

  • counts (such as the number of traffic accidents)
  • rates (such as the number of crimes per square mile)
  • averages (such as the mean math test score)
  • indices (such as a customer satisfaction score)

If an analysis_field is not supplied, hot spot results are based on point densities only.

divided_by_field

Optional string. The numeric field in the analysis_layer that will be used to normalize your data. For example, if your points represent crimes, dividing by total population would result in an analysis of crimes per capita rather than raw crime counts.

You can use esriPopulation to geoenrich each area feature with the most recent population values, which will then be used as the attribute to divide by. This option will use credits.

bounding_polygon_layer Optional layer. When the analysis layer is points and no analysis_field is specified, you can provide polygons features that define where incidents could have occurred. For example, if you are analyzing boating accidents in a harbor, the outline of the harbor might provide a good boundary for where accidents could occur. When no bounding areas are provided, only locations with at least one point will be included in the analysis. See Feature Input.
aggregation_polygon_layer Optional layer. When the analysis_layer contains points and no analysis_field is specified, you can provide polygon features into which the points will be aggregated and analyzed, such as administrative units. The number of points that fall within each polygon are counted, and the point count in each polygon is analyzed. See Feature Input.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affects method execution. For find_hot_spots, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the analysis_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the data will be projected into the output spatial reference prior to analysis.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. Is true, the number of credits needed to run the operation will be returned as a float.
shape_type

Optional string. The shape of the polygon mesh the input features will be aggregated into.

  • Fishnet-The input features will be aggregated into a grid of square (fishnet) cells.
  • Hexagon-The input features will be aggregated into a grid of hexagonal cells.
cell_size Optional float. The size of the grid cells used to aggregate your features. When aggregating into a hexagon grid, this distance is used as the height to construct the hexagon polygons.
cell_size_unit

Optional string. The units of the cell_size value. You must provide a value if cell_size has been set.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Miles’, ‘Feet’, ‘Kilometers’]

distance_band Optional float. The spatial extent of the analysis neighborhood. This value determines which features are analyzed together in order to assess local clustering.
distance_band_unit Optional string. The units of the distance_band value. You must provide a value if distance_band has been set.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To find significant hot ot cold spots of collisions involving a bicycle within a specific boundary.
collision_hot_spots = find_hot_spots(collisions,
                                     bounding_polygon_layer=boundry_lyr,
                                     output_name='collision_hexagon_hot_spots',
                                     shape_type='hexagon')

find_nearest

arcgis.features.analysis.find_nearest(analysis_layer, near_layer, measurement_type='StraightLine', max_count=100, search_cutoff=2147483647, search_cutoff_units=None, time_of_day=None, time_zone_for_time_of_day='GeoLocal', output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, include_route_layers=None, point_barrier_layer=None, line_barrier_layer=None, polygon_barrier_layer=None)
_images/find_nearest.png

The find_nearest method measures the straight-line distance, driving distance, or driving time from features in the analysis layer to features in the near layer, and copies the nearest features in the near layer to a new layer. Connecting lines showing the measured path are returned as well. find_nearest also reports the measurement and relative rank of each nearest feature. There are options to limit the number of nearest features to find or the search range in which to find them. The results from this method can help you answer the following kinds of questions:

  • What is the nearest park from here?
  • Which hospital can I reach in the shortest drive time? And how long would the trip take on a Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. during rush hour?
  • What are the road distances between major European cities?
  • Which of these patients reside within two miles of these chemical plants?

Find Nearest returns a layer containing the nearest features and a line layer that links the start locations to their nearest locations. The connecting line layer contains information about the start and nearest locations and the distances between.

Parameter Description
analysis_layer Required layer. The features from which the nearest locations are found. This layer can have point, line, or polygon features. See Feature Input.
near_layer Required layer. The nearest features are chosen from this layer. This layer can have point, line, or polygon features. See Feature Input.
measurement_type

Required string. Specify the mode of transportation for the analysis.

Choice list: [‘StraightLine’, ‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time ‘, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

The default is ‘Driving Time’.

max_count

Optional string. The maximum number of nearest locations to find for each feature in analysis_layer. The default is the maximum cutoff allowed by the service, which is 100.

Note that setting a maxCount for this parameter doesn’t guarantee that many features will be found. The search_cutoff and other constraints may also reduce the number of features found.

search_cutoff

Optional float. The maximum range to search for nearest locations from each feature in the analysis_layer. The units for this parameter is always minutes when measurement_type is set to a time based travel mode; otherwise the units are set in the search_cutoff_units parameter.

The default is to search without bounds.

search_cutoff_units

The units of the search_cutoff parameter. This parameter is ignored when measurement_type is set to a time based travel mode because the units for search_cutoff are always minutes in those cases. If measurement_type is set to StraightLine or another distance-based travel mode, and a value for search_cutoff is specified, set the cutoff units using this parameter.

Choice list: [‘Kilometers’, ‘Meters’, ‘Miles’, ‘Feet’, ‘’]

The default value is null, which causes the service to choose either miles or kilometers according to the units property of the user making the request.

time_of_day

Optional datetime.datetime. Specify whether travel times should consider traffic conditions. To use traffic in the analysis, set measurement_type to a travel mode object whose impedance_attribute_name property is set to travel_time and assign a value to time_of_day. (A travel mode with other impedance_attribute_name values don’t support traffic.) The time_of_day value represents the time at which travel begins, or departs, from the origin points. The time is specified as datetime.datetime.

The service supports two kinds of traffic: typical and live. Typical traffic references travel speeds that are made up of historical averages for each five-minute interval spanning a week. Live traffic retrieves speeds from a traffic feed that processes phone probe records, sensors, and other data sources to record actual travel speeds and predict speeds for the near future.

The data coverage page shows the countries Esri currently provides traffic data for.

Typical Traffic:

To ensure the task uses typical traffic in locations where it is available, choose a time and day of the week, and then convert the day of the week to one of the following dates from 1990:

  • Monday—1/1/1990
  • Tuesday—1/2/1990
  • Wednesday—1/3/1990
  • Thursday—1/4/1990
  • Friday—1/5/1990
  • Saturday—1/6/1990
  • Sunday—1/7/1990

Set the time and date as datetime.datetime.

For example, to solve for 1:03 p.m. on Thursdays, set the time and date to 1:03 p.m., 4 January 1990; and convert to datetime eg. datetime.datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3).

Live Traffic:

To use live traffic when and where it is available, choose a time and date and convert to datetime.

Esri saves live traffic data for 12 hours and references predictive data extending 12 hours into the future. If the time and date you specify for this parameter is outside the 24-hour time window, or the travel time in the analysis continues past the predictive data window, the task falls back to typical traffic speeds.

Examples: from datetime import datetime

  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3) # 13:03, 4 January 1990. Typical traffic on Thursdays at 1:03 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(1990, 1, 7, 17, 0) # 17:00, 7 January 1990. Typical traffic on Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2014, 10, 22, 8, 0) # 8:00, 22 October 2014. If the current time is between 8:00 p.m., 21 Oct. 2014 and 8:00 p.m., 22 Oct. 2014, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
  • “time_of_day”: datetime(2015, 3, 18, 10, 20) # 10:20, 18 March 2015. If the current time is between 10:20 p.m., 17 Mar. 2015 and 10:20 p.m., 18 Mar. 2015, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
time_zone_for_time_of_day

Optional string. Specify the time zone or zones of the time_of_day parameter.

Choice list: [‘GeoLocal’, ‘UTC’]

GeoLocal-refers to the time zone in which the origins_layer points are located.

UTC-refers to Coordinated Universal Time.

include_route_layers

Optional boolean. When include_route_layers is set to True, each route from the result is also saved as a route layer item. A route layer includes all the information for a particular route such as the stops assigned to the route as well as the travel directions. Creating route layers is useful if you want to share individual routes with other members in your organization. The route layers use the output feature service name provided in the output_name parameter as a prefix and the route name generated as part of the analysis is added to create a unique name for each route layer.

Caution:

Route layers cannot be created when the output is a feature collection. The task will raise an error if output_name is not specified (which indicates feature collection output) and include_route_layers is True.

The maximum number of route layers that can be created is 1,000. If the result contains more than 1,000 routes and include_route_layers is True, the task will only create the output feature service.

point_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more point features that act as temporary restrictions (in other words, barriers) when traveling on the underlying streets.

A point barrier can model a fallen tree, an accident, a downed electrical line, or anything that completely blocks traffic at a specific position along the street. Travel is permitted on the street but not through the barrier.

line_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more line features that prohibit travel anywhere the lines intersect the streets.

A line barrier prohibits travel anywhere the barrier intersects the streets. For example, a parade or protest that blocks traffic across several street segments can be modeled with a line barrier.

polygon_barrier_layer

Optional layer. Specify one or more polygon features that completely restrict travel on the streets intersected by the polygons.

One use of this type of barrier is to model floods covering areas of the street network and making road travel there impossible.

output_name Optional string. Output feature layer collection. If not provided, a feature collection is returned.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For find_nearest, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:

dict with the following keys:

“nearest_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

“connecting_lines_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

#USAGE EXAMPLE: To find which regional office can be reached in the shortest drive time from esri headquarter. 

result1 = find_nearest(analysis_layer=esri_hq_lyr,
                       near_layer=regional_offices_lyr,
                       measurement_type="Driving Time",
                       output_name="find nearest office",
                       include_route_layers=True,
                       point_barrier_layer=road_closures_lyr))           

find_point_clusters

arcgis.features.analysis.find_point_clusters(analysis_layer, min_features_cluster, search_distance=None, search_distance_unit=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/find_point_clusters.png

The find_point_clusters method finds clusters of point features within surrounding noise based on their spatial distribution.

This method uses unsupervised machine learning clustering algorithms to detect patterns of point features based purely on spatial location and, optionally, the distance to a specified number of features.

The result map shows each cluster identified as well as features considered noise. Multiple clusters will be assigned each color. Colors will be assigned and repeated so that each cluster is visually distinct from its neighboring clusters.

This method utilizes two related algorithms. By default the HDBSCAN algorithm is used to find clusters. If a search_distance is specified, the DBSCAN algorithm is used. DBSCAN is only appropriate if there is a very clear search distance to use for your analysis and will return clusters with similar densities. When no search_distance is specified, HDBSCAN will use a range of distances to separate clusters of varying densities from sparser noise resulting in more data-driven clusters.

Argument Description
analysis_layer Required layer. The point feature layer for which density-based clustering will be calculated. See Feature Input.
min_features_cluster Required integer. The minimum number of features to be considered a cluster. Any cluster with fewer features than the number provided will be considered noise.
search_distance Optional float. The maximum distance to consider. The Minimum Features per Cluster specified must be found within this distance for cluster membership. Individual clusters will be separated by at least this distance. If a feature is located further than this distance from the next closest feature in the cluster, it will not be included in the cluster.
search_distance_unit

Optional string. The linear unit to be used with the distance value specified for search_distance. You must provide a value if search_distance has been set.

Choice list: [‘Feet’, ‘Miles’, ‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’]

The default is ‘Miles’.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect method execution. For find_point_clusters, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input layer that intersect the bounding box will be buffered.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional Boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To find patterns of taffic accidents purely on spatial location.
clusters= find_point_clusters(collision,
                              min_features_cluster=200,
                              search_distance=2,
                              search_distance_unit='Kilometers',
                              output_name='find point clusters')

find_similar_locations

arcgis.features.analysis.find_similar_locations(input_layer, search_layer, analysis_fields=[], input_query=None, number_of_results=0, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/find_similar_locations.png

The find_similar_locations method measures the similarity of candidate locations to one or more reference locations.

Based on criteria you specify, Find find_similar_locations can answer questions such as the following:

Which of your stores are most similar to your top performers with regard to customer profiles? Based on characteristics of villages hardest hit by the disease, which other villages are high risk? To answer questions such as these, you provide the reference locations (the input_layer parameter), the candidate locations (the search_layer parameter), and the fields representing the criteria you want to match. For example, the input_layer might be a layer containing your top performing stores or the villages hardest hit by the disease. The search_layer contains your candidate locations to search. This might be all of your stores or all other villages. Finally, you supply a list of fields to use for measuring similarity. find_similar_locations will rank all of the candidate locations by how closely they match your reference locations across all of the fields you have selected.

Argument Description
input_layer

Required feature layer. The input_layer contains one or more reference locations against which features in the search_layer will be evaluated for similarity. For example, the input_layer might contain your top performing stores or the villages hardest hit by a disease. It is not uncommon that the input_layer and search_layer are the same feature service. For example, the feature service contains locations of all stores, one of which is your top performing store. If you want to rank the remaining stores from most to least similar to your top performing store, you can provide a filter for both the inputLayer and the search_layer. The filter on the input_layer would select the top performing store while the filter on the search_layer would select all stores except for the top performing store. You can also use the optional input_query parameter to specify reference locations.

If there is more than one reference location, similarity will be based on averages for the fields you specify in the analysis_fields parameter. So, for example, if there are two reference locations and you are interested in matching population, the task will look for candidate locations in the search_layer with populations that are most like the average population for both reference locations. If the values for the reference locations are 100 and 102, for example, the method will look for candidate locations with populations near 101. Consequently, you will want to use fields for the reference locations fields that have similar values. If, for example, the population values for one reference location is 100 and the other is 100,000, the tool will look for candidate locations with population values near the average of those two values: 50,050. Notice that this averaged value is nothing like the population for either of the reference locations. See Feature Input.

search_layer Required feature layer. The layer containing candidate locations that will be evaluated against the reference locations. See Feature Input.
analysis_fields Required list of strings. A list of fields whose values are used to determine similarity. They must be numeric fields and the fields must exist on both the input_layer and the search_layer. The method will find features in the search_layer that have field values closest to those of the features in your input_layer.
input_query Optional string. In the situation where the input_layer and the search_layer are the same feature service, this parameter allows you to input a query on the input_layer to specify which features are the reference locations. The reference locations specified by this query will not be analyzed as candidates. The syntax of input_query is the same as a filter.
number_of_results Optional int. The number of ranked candidate locations output to the similar_result_layer. If number_of_results is not specified, or set to zero, all candidate locations will be ranked and output.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect method execution. For find_similar_locations, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Python dictionary with the following keys:

”similar_result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”process_info” : list of message

#USAGE EXAMPLE: To find top 4 most locations from the candidates layer that are similar to the target location.
top_4_most_similar_locations = find_similar_locations(target_lyr, candidates_lyr,
                                            analysis_fields=['THH17','THH35','THH02','THH05','POPDENS14','FAMGRW10_14','UNEMPRT_CY'],
                                            output_name = "top 4 similar locations",
                                            number_of_results=4)

find_centroids

arcgis.features.analysis.find_centroids(input_layer, point_location=False, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/find_centroids.png

The find_centroids method that finds and generates points from the representative center (centroid) of each input multipoint, line, or area feature. Finding the centroid of a feature is very common for many analytical workflows where the resulting points can then be used in other analytic workflows.

For example, polygon features that contain demographic data can be converted to centroids that can be used in network analysis.

Argument Description
input_layer Required feature layer. The multipoint, line, or polygon features that will be used to generate centroid point features. See Feature Input.
point_location

Optional boolean. A Boolean value that determines the output location of the points.

  • True - Output points will be the nearest point to the actual centroid, but located inside or contained by the bounds of the input feature.
  • False - Output point locations will be determined by the calculated geometric center of each input feature. This is the default.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect method execution. For find_centroids, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will be buffered.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
# USAGE EXAMPLE: To find centroids of madison fields nearest to the actual centroids.

centroid = find_centroids(madison_fields,
                          point_location=True,
                          output_name='find centroids')              

interpolate_points

arcgis.features.analysis.interpolate_points(input_layer, field, interpolate_option='5', output_prediction_error=False, classification_type='GeometricInterval', num_classes=10, class_breaks=[], bounding_polygon_layer=None, predict_at_point_layer=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/interpolate_points.png

The interpolate_points method allows you to predict values at new locations based on measurements from a collection of points. The method takes point data with values at each point and returns areas classified by predicted values. For example:

  • An air quality management district has sensors that measure pollution levels. interpolate_points can be used to predict pollution levels at locations that don’t have sensors, such as locations with at-risk populations—schools or hospitals, for example.
  • Predict heavy metal concentrations in crops based on samples taken from individual plants.
  • Predict soil nutrient levels (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and so on) and other indicators (such as electrical conductivity) in order to study their relationships to crop yield and prescribe precise amounts of fertilizer for each location in the field.
  • Meteorological applications include prediction of temperatures, rainfall, and associated variables (such as acid rain).

interpolate_points uses the Empirical Bayesian Kriging geoprocessing tool to perform the interpolation. The parameters that are supplied to the Empirical Bayesian Kriging tool are controlled by the interpolate_option request parameter.

If a value of 1 is provided for interpolate_option, empirical Bayesian kriging will use the following parameters:

  • transformation_type—NONE
  • semivariogram_model_type—POWER
  • max_local_points—50
  • overlap_factor—1
  • number_semivariograms—30
  • nbrMin—8
  • nbrMax—8

If a value of 5 is provided for interpolate_option, empirical Bayesian kriging will use the following parameters:

  • transformation_type—NONE
  • semivariogram_model_type—POWER
  • max_local_points—75
  • overlap_factor—1.5
  • number_semivariograms—100
  • nbrMin—10
  • nbrMax—10

If a value of 9 is provided for interpolate_option, empirical Bayesian kriging will use the following parameters:

  • transformation_type—EMPIRICAL
  • semivariogram_model_type—K_BESSEL
  • max_local_points—200
  • overlap_factor—3
  • number_semivariograms—200
  • nbrMin—15
  • nbrMax—15
Argument Description
input_layer Required layer. The point layer whose features will be interpolated. See Feature Input.
field Required string. Name of the numeric field containing the values you wish to interpolate.
interpolate_option

Optional integer. Integer value declaring your preference for speed versus accuracy, from 1 (fastest) to 9 (most accurate). More accurate predictions take longer to calculate.

Choice list: [1, 5, 9].

The default is 5.

output_prediction_error

Optional boolean. If True, a polygon layer of standard errors for the interpolation predictions will be returned in the prediction_error output parameter.

Standard errors are useful because they provide information about the reliability of the predicted values. A simple rule of thumb is that the true value will fall within two standard errors of the predicted value 95 percent of the time. For example, suppose a new location gets a predicted value of 50 with a standard error of 5. This means that this task’s best guess is that the true value at that location is 50, but it reasonably could be as low as 40 or as high as 60. To calculate this range of reasonable values, multiply the standard error by 2, add this value to the predicted value to get the upper end of the range, and subtract it from the predicted value to get the lower end of the range.

classification_type

Optional string. Determines how predicted values will be classified into areas.

  • EqualArea—Polygons are created such that the number of data values in each area is equal. For example, if the data has more large values than small values, more areas will be created for large values.
  • EqualInterval—Polygons are created such that the range of predicted values is equal for each area.
  • GeometricInterval—Polygons are based on class intervals that have a geometrical series. This method ensures that each class range has approximately the same number of values within each class and that the change between intervals is consistent.
  • Manual—You to define your own range of values for areas. These values will be entered in the class_breaks parameter below.

Choice list: [‘EqualArea’, ‘EqualInterval’, ‘GeometricInterval’, ‘Manual’]

The default is ‘GeometricInterval’.

num_classes

Optional integer. This value is used to divide the range of interpolated values into distinct classes. The range of values in each class is determined by the classification_type parameter. Each class defines the boundaries of the result polygons.

The default is 10. The maximum value is 32.

class_breaks Optional list of floats. If classification_type is Manual, supply desired class break values separated by spaces. These values define the upper limit of each class, so the number of classes will equal the number of entered values. Areas will not be created for any locations with predicted values above the largest entered break value. You must enter at least two values and no more than 32.
bounding_polygon_layer Optional layer. A layer specifying the polygon(s) where you want values to be interpolated. For example, if you are interpolating densities of fish within a lake, you can use the boundary of the lake in this parameter and the output will only contain polygons within the boundary of the lake. See Feature Input.
predict_at_point_layer

Optional layer. An optional layer specifying point locations to calculate prediction values. This allows you to make predictions at specific locations of interest. For example, if the input_layer represents measurements of pollution levels, you can use this parameter to predict the pollution levels of locations with large at-risk populations, such as schools or hospitals. You can then use this information to give recommendations to health officials in those locations.

If supplied, the output predicted_point_layer will contain predictions at the specified locations. See Feature Input.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context Optional string. Additional settings such as processing extent and output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Python dictionary with the following keys:

”result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”prediction_error” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”predicted_point_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

#USAGE EXAMPLE: To predict mine production in US at new locations.
interpolated = interpolate_points(coal_mines_us,
                                  field='Total_Prod',
                                  interpolate_option=5,
                                  output_prediction_error=True,
                                  classification_type='GeometricInterval',
                                  num_classes=10,
                                  output_name='interpolate coal mines production')                 

join_features

arcgis.features.analysis.join_features(target_layer, join_layer, spatial_relationship=None, spatial_relationship_distance=None, spatial_relationship_distance_units=None, attribute_relationship=None, join_operation='JoinOneToOne', summary_fields=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/join_features.png

The join_features method works with two layers and joins the attributes from one feature to another based on spatial and attribute relationships.

Parameter Description
target_layer Required layer. The point, line, polygon or table layer that will have attributes from the join_layer appended to its table. See Feature Input.
join_layer Required layer. The point, line, polygon or table layer that will be joined to the target_layer. See Feature Input.
spatial_relationship

Required string. Defines the spatial relationship used to spatially join features.

Choice list: [‘identicalto’, ‘intersects’, ‘completelycontains’, ‘completelywithin’, ‘withindistance’]

spatial_relationship_distance (Required if spatial_relationship is withindistance) Optional float. A float value used for the search distance to determine if the target features are near or within a specified distance of the join features. This is only applied if Within a distance of is the selected spatial_relationship. You can only enter a single distance value. The units of the distance values are supplied by the spatial_relationship_distance_units parameter.
spatial_relationship_distance_units (Required if spatial_relationship is withindistance)

Optional string. The linear unit to be used with the distance value specified in spatial_relationship_distance.

Choice list: [‘Miles’, ‘Yards’, ‘Feet’, ‘NauticalMiles’, ‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’]

The default is ‘Miles’.

attribute_relationship Optional list of dicts. Defines an attribute relationship used to join features. Features are matched when the field values in the join layer are equal to field values in the target layer.
join_operation

Optional string. A string representing the type of join that will be applied.

Choice list: [‘JoinOneToOne’, ‘JoinOneToMany’]

  • JoinOneToOne—If multiple join features are found that have the same relationships with a single target feature, the attributes from the multiple join features will be aggregated using the specified summary statistics. For example, if a point target feature is found within two separate polygon join features, the attributes from the two polygons will be aggregated before being transferred to the output point feature class. If one polygon has an attribute value of 3 and the other has a value of 7, and a SummaryField of sum is selected, the aggregated value in the output feature class will be 10. There will always be a Count field calculated, with a value of 2, for the number of features specified. This is the default.
  • JoinOneToMany—If multiple join features are found that have the same relationship with a single target feature, the output feature class will contain multiple copies (records) of the target feature. For example, if a single point target feature is found within two separate polygon join features, the output feature class will contain two copies of the target feature: one record with the attributes of the first polygon, and another record with the attributes of the second polygon. There are no summary statistics calculated with this method.
summary_fields

Optional list of dicts. A list of field names and statistical summary types that you want to calculate. Note that the count is always returned by default.

fieldName is the name of one of the numeric fields found in the input join layer.

statisticType is one of the following:

  • SUM—Adds the total value of all the points in each polygon
  • MEAN—Calculates the average of all the points in each polygon
  • MIN—Finds the smallest value of all the points in each polygon
  • MAX—Finds the largest value of all the points in each polygon
  • STDDEV—Finds the standard deviation of all the points in each polygon
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect method execution. For join_features, there are the following two settings:

  1. Extent (extent)—A bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—The output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else feature collection.
USAGE EXAMPLE: To summarize traffic accidents within each parcel using spatial relationship.
accident_count_in_each_parcel = join_features(target_layer=parcel_lyr,
                                              join_layer=traffic_accidents_lyr,
                                              spatial_relationship='intersects',
                                              output_name='join features',
                                              context={"extent":{"xmin":-9375809.87305117,"ymin":4031882.3806860778,"xmax":-9370182.196843527,"ymax":4034872.9794178144,"spatialReference":{"wkid":102100,"latestWkid":3857}}}, )

merge_layers

arcgis.features.analysis.merge_layers(input_layer, merge_layer, merging_attributes=[], output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/merge_layers.png

The merge_layers method copies features from two layers into a new layer. The layers to be merged must all contain the same feature types (points, lines, or polygons). You can control how the fields from the input layers are joined and copied. For example:

  • I have three layers for England, Wales, and Scotland and I want a single layer of Great Britain.
  • I have two layers containing parcel information for contiguous townships. I want to join them together into a single layer, keeping only the fields that have the same name and type on the two layers.
Argument Description
input_layer Required feature layer. The point, line or polygon features with the merge_layer. See Feature Input.
merge_layer Required feature layer. The point, line, or polygon features to merge with the input_layer. The merge_layer must contain the same feature type (point, line, or polygon) as the input_layer. See Feature Input.
merge_attributes

Optional list. Defines how the fields in merge_layer will be modified. By default, all fields from both inputs will be included in the output layer.

If a field exists in one layer but not the other, the output layer will still contain the field. The output field will contain null values for the input features that did not have the field. For example, if the input_layer contains a field named TYPE but the merge_layer does not contain TYPE, the output will contain TYPE, but its values will be null for all the features copied from the merge_layer.

You can control how fields in the merge_layer are written to the output layer using the following merge types that operate on a specified merge_layer field:

  • Remove - The field in the merge_layer will be removed from the output layer.
  • Rename - The field in the merge_layer will be renamed in the output layer. You cannot rename a field in the merge_layer to a field in the input_layer. If you want to make field names equivalent, use Match.
  • Match - A field in the merge_layer is made equivalent to a field in the input_layer specified by merge value. For example, the input_layer has a field named CODE and the merge_layer has a field named STATUS. You can match STATUS to CODE, and the output will contain the CODE field with values of the STATUS field used for features copied from the merge_layer. Type casting is supported (for example, float to integer, integer to string) except for string to numeric.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional dict. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For merge_layers, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)-a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer and the merge_layer that intersect the bounding box will be merged into the output layer.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the estimated number of credits required to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
#USAGE EXAMPLE: To merge two layers into a new layer using merge attributes.
merged = merge_layers(input_layer=esri_offices,
                      merge_layer=satellite_soffice_lyr,
                      merging_attributes=["State Match Place_Name"],
                      output_name="merge layers")

overlay_layers

arcgis.features.analysis.overlay_layers(input_layer, overlay_layer, overlay_type='Intersect', snap_to_input=False, output_type='Input', tolerance=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/overlay_layers.png

The overlay_layers method combines two or more layers into one single layer. You can think of overlay as peering through a stack of maps and creating a single map containing all the information found in the stack. In fact, before the advent of GIS, cartographers would literally copy maps onto clear acetate sheets, overlay these sheets on a light table, and hand draw a new map from the overlaid data. Overlay is much more than a merging of line work; all the attributes of the features taking part in the overlay are carried through to the final product. Overlay is used to answer one of the most basic questions of geography, “what is on top of what?” For example:

  • What parcels are within the 100-year floodplain? (Within is just another way of saying on top of.)
  • What roads are within what counties?
  • What land use is on top of what soil type?
  • What wells are within abandoned military bases?
Argument Description
input_layer Required layer. The point, line, or polygon features that will be overlayed with the overlay_layer. See Feature Input.
overlay_layer Required layer. The features that will be overlaid with the input_layer features. See Feature Input.
overlay_type

Optional string. The type of overlay to be performed.

Choice list: [‘Intersect’, ‘Union’, ‘Erase’]

Intersect Intersect-Computes a geometric intersection of the input layers. Features or portions of features which overlap in both the input_layer and overlay_layer layer will be written to the output layer. This is the default.
Union Union-Computes a geometric union of the input layers. All features and their attributes will be written to the output layer. This option is only valid if both the input_layer and the overlay_layer contain polygon features.
Erase Erase-Only those features or portions of features in the overlay_layer that are not within the features in the input_layer layer are written to the output.

The default value is ‘Intersect’.

snap_to_input Optional boolean. A Boolean value indicating if feature vertices in the input_layer are allowed to move. The default is false and means if the distance between features is less than the tolerance value, all features from both layers can move to allow snapping to each other. When set to true, only features in overlay_layer can move to snap to the input_layer features.
output_type

Optional string. The type of intersection you want to find. This parameter is only valid when the overlay_type is Intersect.

Choice list: [‘Input’, ‘Line’, ‘Point’]

  • Input - The features returned will be the same geometry type as the input_layer or overlay_layer with the lowest dimension geometry. If all inputs are polygons, the output will contain polygons. If one or more of the inputs are lines and none of the inputs are points, the output will be line. If one or more of the inputs are points, the output will contain points. This is the default.
  • Line - Line intersections will be returned. This is only valid if none of the inputs are points.
  • Point - Point intersections will be returned. If the inputs are line or polygon, the output will be a multipoint layer.
tolerance Optional float. A float value of the minimum distance separating all feature coordinates as well as the distance a coordinate can move in X or Y (or both). The units of tolerance are the same as the units of the input_layer.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For overlay_layers, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input_layer and overlay_layer and that intersect the bounding box will be overlaid.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.
#USAGE EXAMPLE: To clip a buffer in the shape of Capitol hill neighborhood.
cliped_buffer = overlay_layers(buffer,
                               neighbourhood,
                               output_name="Cliped buffer")

plan_routes

arcgis.features.analysis.plan_routes(stops_layer, route_count, max_stops_per_route, route_start_time, start_layer, start_layer_route_id_field=None, return_to_start=True, end_layer=None, end_layer_route_id_field=None, travel_mode='Driving Time', stop_service_time=0, max_route_time=525600, include_route_layers=False, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False, point_barrier_layer=None, line_barrier_layer=None, polygon_barrier_layer=None)
_images/plan_routes.png

The plan_routes method determines how to efficiently divide tasks among a mobile workforce.

You provide the input, which includes a set of stops and the number of vehicles available to visit the stops, and the tool assigns the stops to vehicles and returns routes showing how each vehicle can reach their assigned stops in the least amount of time.

With plan_routes, mobile workforces reach more jobsites in less time, which increases productivity and improves customer service. Organizations often use plan_routes to:

  • Inspect homes, restaurants, and construction sites
  • Provide repair, installation, and technical services
  • Deliver items and small packages
  • Make sales calls
  • Provide van transportation from spectators’ homes to events

The output from plan_routes includes a layer of routes showing the shortest paths to visit the stops; a layer of the stops assigned to routes, as well as any stops that couldn’t be reached due to the given parameter settings; and a layer of directions containing the travel itinerary for each route.

Parameter Description
stops_layer Required feature layer. The points that the vehicles, drivers, or routes, should visit. The fields on the input stops are included in the output stops, so if your input layer has a field such as Name, Address, or ProductDescription, that information will be available in the results. See Feature Input.
route_count

Required integer. The number of vehicles that are available to visit the stops. The method supports up to 100 vehicles.

The default value is 0.

The method may be able to find and return a solution that uses fewer vehicles than the number you specify for this parameter. The number of vehicles returned also depends on four other parameters: the total number of stops in stops_layer, the number of stops per vehicle you allow (max_stops_per_route), the travel time between stops, the time spent at each stop (stop_service_time), and any limit you set on the total route time per vehicle (max_route_time).

max_stops_per_route

Required integer. The maximum number of stops a route, or vehicle, is allowed to visit. The largest value you can specify is 200. The default value is zero.

This is one of two parameters that balance the overall workload across routes. The other is max_route_time.

By lowering the maximum number of stops that can be assigned to each vehicle, the vehicles are more likely to have an equal number of stops assigned to them. This helps balance workloads among drivers. The drawback, however, is that it may result in a solution that is less efficient.

By increasing the stops per vehicle, the tool has more freedom to find more efficient solutions; however, the workload may be unevenly distributed among drivers and vehicles. Note that you can balance workloads by time instead of number of stops by specifying a value for the max_route_time parameter.

The following examples demonstrate the effects of limiting the maximum stops per vehicle or the total time per vehicle. In all of these examples, two routes start at the same location and visit a total of six stops.

balanced

Balanced travel times and stops per route:

The stops are more or less uniformly spread apart, so setting ``max_stops_per_route``=3 to evenly distribute the workload results in routes that are roughly the same duration.

partially_balanced

Balanced stops per route but unbalanced travel times:

Five of the six stops are clustered near the starting location, but one stop is set apart and requires a much longer drive to be reached. Dividing the stops equally between the two routes (``max_stops_per_route``=3) causes unbalanced travel times.

unbalanced

Unbalanced stops per route but balanced travel times:

The stops are in the same location as the previous graphic. By increasing the value of max_stops_per_route to 4, and limiting the total travel time per vehicle (max_route_time), the travel times are balanced even though one route visits more stops.

route_start_time

Required datetime.datetime. Specify when the vehicles or people start their routes. The time is specified as datetime. The starting time value is the same for all routes; that is, all routes start at the same time.

Time zones affect what value you assign to route_start_time. The time zone for the start time is based on the time zone in which the starting point is geographically located. For instance, if you have one route starting location and it is located in Pacific Standard Time (PST), the time you specify for route_start_time is in PST.

There are a couple of scenarios to beware of given that starting times are based on where the starting points are located. One situation to be careful of is when you are located in one time zone but your starting locations are in another times zone. For instance, assume you are in Pacific Standard Time (UTC-8:00) and the vehicles you are routing are stationed in Mountain Standard Time (UTC-7:00). If it is currently 9:30 a.m. PST (10:30 a.m. MST) and your vehicles need to begin their routes in 30 minutes, you would set the start time to 11:00 a.m. That is, the starting locations for the routes are in the Mountain time zone, and it is currently 10:30 a.m. there, therefore, a starting time of 30 minutes from now is 11:00 a.m. Make sure you set the parameter according to the proper time zone.

The other situation that requires caution is where starting locations are spread across multiple time zones. The time you set for route_start_time is specific to the time zone in which the starting location is—regardless of whether there are one or more starting locations in the problem you submit. For instance, if one route starts from a point in PST and another route starts from MST, and you enter 11:00 a.m. as the start time, the route in PST will start at 11:00 a.m. PST and the route in MST will start at 11:00 a.m. MST—a one-hour difference. The starting times are the same in local time, but offset in actual time, or UTC.

The service automatically determines the time zones of the input starting locations (start_layer) for you.

Examples:

  • datetime(2014, 10, 22, 8, 0) # 8:00, 22 October 2014. Routes will depart their starting locations at 8:00 a.m., 22 October. Any routes with starting points in Mountain Standard Time start at 8:00 a.m., 22 October 2014 MST; any routes with starting points in Pacific Standard Time start at 8:00 a.m. 22 October 2014 PST, and so on.
  • datetime(2015, 3, 18, 10, 20) # 10:20, 18 March 2015.
start_layer

Required feature layer. Provide the locations where the people or vehicles start their routes. You can specify one or many starting locations.

If specifying one, all routes will start from the one location. If specifying many starting locations, each route needs exactly one predefined starting location, and the following criteria must be met:

The number of routes (route_count) must equal the number of points in start_layer. (However, when only one point is included in start_layer, it is assumed that all routes start from the same location, and the two numbers can be different.) The starting location for each route must be identified with the start_layer_route_id_field parameter. This implies that the input points in start_layer have a unique identifier. Bear in mind that if you also have many ending locations, those locations need to be predetermined as well. The predetermined start and end locations of each route are paired together by matching route ID values. See the the section of this topic entitled Starting and ending locations of routes to learn more. See Feature Input.

start_layer_route_id_field

Optional string. Choose a field that uniquely identifies points in start_layer. This parameter is required when start_layer has more than one point; it is ignored otherwise.

The start_layer_route_id_field parameter helps identify where routes begin and indicates the names of the output routes.

See the the section of this topic entitled Starting and ending locations of routes to learn more.

return_to_start

Optional boolean. A True value indicates each route must end its trip at the same place where it started. The starting location is defined by the start_layer and start_layer_route_id_field parameters.

The default value is True.

end_layer

Optional layer. Provide the locations where the people or vehicles end their routes.

If end_layer is not specified, return_to_start must be set to True.

You can specify one or many ending locations.

If specifying one, all routes will end at the one location. If specifying many ending locations, each route needs exactly one predefined ending location, and the following criteria must be met:

  • The number of routes (route_count) must equal the number of points in end_layer.
(However, when only one point is included in end_layer, it is assumed that all routes end at the same location, and the two numbers can be different.)
  • The ending location for each route must be identified with the start_layer_route_id_field
parameter. This implies that the input points in endLayer have a unique identifier. Bear in mind that if you also have many starting locations, those locations need to be predetermined as well. The predetermined start and end locations of each route are paired together by matching route ID values. See Feature Input.
end_layer_route_id_field

Optional string. Choose a field that uniquely identifies points in end_layer. This parameter is required when end_layer has more than one point; it is ignored if there is one point or if return_to_start is True.

The end_layer_route_id_field parameter helps identify where routes end and indicates the names of the output routes.

See the the section of this topic entitled Starting and ending locations of routes to learn more.

travel_mode

Optional string. Optional string. Specify the mode of transportation for the analysis.

Choice list: [‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time’, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

stop_service_time Optional float. Indicates how much time, in minutes, is spent at each stop. The units are minutes. All stops are assinged the same service duration from this parameter—unique values for individual stops cannot be specified with this service.
max_route_time

Optional float. The amount of time you specify here limits the maximum duration of each route. The maximum route time is an accumulation of travel time and the total service time at visited stops (stop_service_time). This parameter is commonly used to prevent drivers from working too many hours or to balance workloads across routes or drivers.

The units are ‘minutes’. The default value, which is also the maximum value, is 525600 minutes, or one year.

include_route_layers Optional boolean. When include_route_layers is set to True, each route from the result is also saved as a route layer item. A route layer includes all the information for a particular route such as the stops assigned to the route as well as the travel directions. Creating route layers is useful if you want to share individual routes with other members in your organization. The route layers use the output feature service name provided in the output_name parameter as a prefix and the route name generated as part of the analysis is added to create a unique name for each route layer.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For plan_routes, there are two settings:

  1. Extent (extent)—A bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the inputLayer, start_layer, and endLayer that are within the bounding box can be visited by routes.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)-If the output is a feature service, the spatial reference will be the same as stops_layer. Setting outSR for feature services has no effect. If the output is a feature collection, the features will be in the spatial reference of the outSR value or the spatial reference of stops_layer when outSR is not specified.
gis Optional, the GIS on which this tool runs. If not specified, the active GIS is used.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
point_barrier_layer

Optional feature layer. Specify one or more point features that act as temporary restrictions (in other words, barriers) when traveling on the underlying streets.

A point barrier can model a fallen tree, an accident, a downed electrical line, or anything that completely blocks traffic at a specific position along the street. Travel is permitted on the street but not through the barrier. See Feature Input.

line_barrier_layer

Optional feature layer. Specify one or more line features that prohibit travel anywhere the lines intersect the streets.

A line barrier prohibits travel anywhere the barrier intersects the streets. For example, a parade or protest that blocks traffic across several street segments can be modeled with a line barrier. See Feature Input.

polygon_barrier_layer

Optional feature layer. Specify one or more polygon features that completely restrict travel on the streets intersected by the polygons.

One use of this type of barrier is to model floods covering areas of the street network and making road travel there impossible. See Feature Input.

Returns:feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else dict with the following keys:

”routes_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”assigned_stops_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”unassigned_stops_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

# USAGE EXAMPLE: To plan routes to provide cab from employee residence to office.
route = plan_routes(stops_layer=employee_residence,
                    route_count=4,
                    max_stops_per_route=4,
                    route_start_time=datetime(2019, 6, 20, 6, 0),
                    start_layer=office_location,
                    start_layer_route_id_field='n_office',
                    return_to_start=False,
                    end_layer=office_location,
                    end_layer_route_id_field='n_office',
                    travel_mode='Driving Time',
                    stop_service_time=5,
                    include_route_layers=False,
                    output_name='plan route for employees')

summarize_nearby

arcgis.features.analysis.summarize_nearby(sum_nearby_layer, summary_layer, near_type='StraightLine', distances=[], units='Meters', time_of_day=None, time_zone_for_time_of_day='GeoLocal', return_boundaries=True, sum_shape=True, shape_units=None, summary_fields=[], group_by_field=None, minority_majority=False, percent_shape=False, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/summarize_nearby.png

The summarize_nearby method finds features that are within a specified distance of features in the input layer. Distance can be measured as a straight-line distance, a drive-time distance (for example, within 10 minutes), or a drive distance (within 5 kilometers). Statistics are then calculated for the nearby features. For example:

  • Calculate the total population within five minutes of driving time of a proposed new store location.
  • Calculate the number of freeway access ramps within a one-mile driving distance of a proposed new store location to use as a measure of store accessibility.
Parameter Description
sum_nearby_layer Required feature layer. Point, line, or polygon features from which distances will be measured to features in the summary_layer. See Feature Input.
summary_layer Required layer. Point, line, or polygon features. Features in this layer that are within the specified distance to features in the sum_nearby_layer will be summarized. See Feature Input.
near_type

Optional string. Defines what kind of distance measurement you want to use: straight-line distance, or by measuring travel time or travel distance along a street network using various modes of transportation known as travel modes.

The default is ‘StraightLine’.

Choice list: [‘StraightLine’, ‘Driving Distance’, ‘Driving Time’, ‘Rural Driving Distance’, ‘Rural Driving Time’, ‘Trucking Distance’, ‘Trucking Time’, ‘Walking Distance’, ‘Walking Time’]

distances Optional float. Float values that defines the search distance (for ‘StraightLine’ and distance based travel modes) or time (for time based travel modes). You can enter a single distance value or multiple values, separating each value with a space. Features that are within (or equal to) the distances you enter will be summarized. The units of the distance values is supplied by the units parameter.
units

Otional string. If near_type is ‘StraightLine’ or a distance-based travel mode, this is the linear unit to be used with the distance value(s) specified in distances.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’]

If near_type is a time based travel mode, the following values can be used as units:

Choice list: [‘Seconds’, ‘Minutes’, ‘Hours’]

The default is ‘Meters’.

time_of_day

Optional datetime.datetime. Specify whether travel times should consider traffic conditions. To use traffic in the analysis, set near_type to a travel mode object whose impedance_attribute_name property is set to travel_time and assign a value to time_of_day. (A travel mode with other impedance_attribute_name values don’t support traffic.) The time_of_day value represents the time at which travel begins, or departs, from the origin points. The time is specified as datetime.datetime.

The service supports two kinds of traffic: typical and live. Typical traffic references travel speeds that are made up of historical averages for each five-minute interval spanning a week. Live traffic retrieves speeds from a traffic feed that processes phone probe records, sensors, and other data sources to record actual travel speeds and predict speeds for the near future.

The data coverage page shows the countries Esri currently provides traffic data for.

Typical Traffic:

To ensure the task uses typical traffic in locations where it is available, choose a time and day of the week, and then convert the day of the week to one of the following dates from 1990:

  • Monday—1/1/1990
  • Tuesday—1/2/1990
  • Wednesday—1/3/1990
  • Thursday—1/4/1990
  • Friday—1/5/1990
  • Saturday—1/6/1990
  • Sunday—1/7/1990

Set the time and date as datetime.datetime.

For example, to solve for 1:03 p.m. on Thursdays, set the time and date to 1:03 p.m., 4 January 1990; and convert to datetime eg. datetime.datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3).

Live Traffic:

To use live traffic when and where it is available, choose a time and date and convert to datetime.

Esri saves live traffic data for 12 hours and references predictive data extending 12 hours into the future. If the time and date you specify for this parameter is outside the 24-hour time window, or the travel time in the analysis continues past the predictive data window, the task falls back to typical traffic speeds.

Examples: from datetime import datetime

  • time_of_day- datetime(1990, 1, 4, 1, 3) # 13:03, 4 January 1990. Typical traffic on Thursdays at 1:03 p.m.
  • time_of_day- datetime(1990, 1, 7, 17, 0) # 17:00, 7 January 1990. Typical traffic on Sundays at 5:00 p.m.
  • time_of_day- datetime(2014, 10, 22, 8, 0) # 8:00, 22 October 2014. If the current time is between 8:00 p.m., 21 Oct. 2014 and 8:00 p.m., 22 Oct. 2014, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
  • time_of_day- datetime(2015, 3, 18, 10, 20) # 10:20, 18 March 2015. If the current time is between 10:20 p.m., 17 Mar. 2015 and 10:20 p.m., 18 Mar. 2015, live traffic speeds are referenced in the analysis; otherwise, typical traffic speeds are referenced.
time_zone_for_time_of_day

Optional string. Specify the time zone or zones of the time_of_day parameter.

Choice list: [‘GeoLocal’, ‘UTC’]

GeoLocal-refers to the time zone in which the originsLayer points are located.

UTC-refers to Coordinated Universal Time.

The default is ‘GeoLocal’.

return_boundaries

Optional boolean. If true, the result_layer will contain areas defined by the specified near_type. For example, if using ‘StraightLine’ of 5 miles, the result_layer will contain areas with a 5 mile radius around the input sum_nearby_layer features.

If False, the result_ayer will contain the same features as the sum_nearby_layer.

The default is True.

sum_shape

Optional boolean. A boolean value that instructs the task to calculate statistics based on shape type of the summary_layer, such as the length of lines or areas of polygons of the summary_layer within each polygon in sum_within_layer.

The default is True.

shape_units

Optional string. If sum_shape is true, you must specify the units of the shape summary. Values:

When summary_layer contains polygons: Values: [‘Acres’, ‘Hectares’, ‘SquareMeters’, ‘SquareKilometers’, ‘SquareFeet’, ‘SquareYards’, ‘SquareMiles’] When summary_layer contains lines: Values: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’]

summary_fields

Optional list of strings.A list of field names and statistical summary types that you want to calculate. Note that the count is always returned by default.

fieldName is the name of one of the numeric fields found in the input join layer.

statisticType is one of the following:

  • SUM-Adds the total value of all the points in each polygon
  • MEAN-Calculates the average of all the points in each polygon
  • MIN-Finds the smallest value of all the points in each polygon
  • MAX-Finds the largest value of all the points in each polygon
  • STDDEV-Finds the standard deviation of all the points in each polygon

Example: [“fieldName summaryType”,”fieldName summaryType”, …]

group_by_field Optional string. This is a field of the summary_layer features that you can use to calculate statistics separately for each unique attribute value. For example, suppose the summary_layer contains point locations of businesses that store hazardous materials, and one of the fields is HazardClass containing codes that describe the type of hazardous material stored. To calculate summaries by each unique value of HazardClass, use HazardClass as the group_by_field field.
minority_majority

Optional boolean. This boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If true, the minority (least dominant) or the majority (most dominant) attribute values for each group field within each nearby area are calculated. Two new fields are added to the result_layer prefixed with Majority_ and Minority_.

The default is False.

percent_shape

Optional boolean. This Boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If set to true, the percentage of each unique group_by_field value is calculated for each sum_nearby_layer feature.

The default is False.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For summarize_nearby, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the sum_nearby_layer and summary_layer that intersect the bounding box will be analyzed.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. Returns the number of credit for the operation.
Returns:result_layer : feature layer Item if output_name is specified, else Feature Collection.

dict with the following keys:

”result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”group_by_summary” : layer (FeatureCollection)

# USAGE EXAMPLE: To find hospital facilities that are within 5 miles of a school.
summarize_nearby(sum_nearby_layer=item2.layers[0],
                 summary_layer=item1.layers[0],
                 near_type='StraightLine',
                 distances=[5],
                 units='Miles',
                 time_zone_for_time_of_day='GeoLocal',
                 return_boundaries=False,
                 sum_shape=True,
                 shape_units=None,
                 output_name='nearest hospitals to schools')        

summarize_center_and_dispersion

arcgis.features.analysis.summarize_center_and_dispersion(analysis_layer, summarize_type=['CentralFeature'], ellipse_size=None, weight_field=None, group_field=None, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/summarize_center_and_dispersion.png

The summarize_center_and_dispersion method finds central features and directional distributions. It can be used to answer questions such as:

  • Where is the center?
  • Which feature is the most accessible from all other features?
  • How dispersed, compact, or integrated are the features?
  • Are there directional trends?s
Argument Description
analysis_layer Required frature layer. The point, line, or polygon features to be analyzed. See Feature Input.
summarize_type

Required list of strings. The method with which to summarize the analysis_layer.

Choice list: [“CentralFeature”, “MeanCenter”, “MedianCenter”, “Ellipse”]

ellipse_size

Optional string. The size of the output ellipse in standard deviations.

Choice list: [‘1 standard deviations’, ‘2 standard deviations’, ‘3 standard deviations’]

The default ellipse size is ‘1 standard deviations’.

weight_field Optional field. A numeric field in the analysis_layer to be used to weight locations according to their relative importance.
group_field Optional field. The field used to group features for separate directional distribution calculations. The group_field can be of integer, date, or string type.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For summarize_center_and_dispersion, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the input layer that intersect the bounding box will be buffered.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:list of items if output_name is supplied else, a Python dictionary with the following keys: “central_feature_result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection) “mean_feature_result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection) “median_feature_result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection) “ellipse_feature_result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)
# USAGE EXAMPLE: To find central features and mean center of earthquake over past months.
central_features = summarize_center_and_dispersion(analysis_layer=earthquakes,
                                                   summarize_type=["CentralFeature","MeanCenter"],
                                                   ellipse_size='2 standard deviations',
                                                   weight_field='mag',
                                                   group_field='magType',
                                                   output_name='find central features and mean center of earthquake over past months')

summarize_within

arcgis.features.analysis.summarize_within(sum_within_layer, summary_layer, sum_shape=True, shape_units=None, summary_fields=[], group_by_field=None, minority_majority=False, percent_shape=False, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/summarize_within.png

The summarize_within method finds the point, line, or polygon features (or portions of these features) that are within the boundaries of polygons in another layer. For example:

  • Given a layer of watershed boundaries and a layer of land-use boundaries by land-use type, calculate total acreage of land-use type for each watershed.
  • Given a layer of parcels in a county and a layer of city boundaries, summarize the average value of vacant parcels within each city boundary.
  • Given a layer of counties and a layer of roads, summarize the total mileage of roads by road type within each county.

You can think of summarize_within as taking two layers and stacking them on top of each other. One of the layers, the sum_within_layer must be a polygon layer, and imagine that these polygon boundaries are all colored red. The other layer, the summary_layer, can be any feature type—point, line, or polygon. After stacking these layers on top of each other, you peer down through the stack and count the number of features in the summary_layer that fall within the polygons with the red boundaries (the sum_within_layer). Not only can you count the number of features, you can calculate simple statistics about the attributes of the features in the summary_layer, such as sum, mean, minimum, maximum, and so on.

Argument Description
sum_within_layer Required feature layer. The polygon features. Features, or portions of features, in the summary_layer (below) that fall within the boundaries of these polygons will be summarized. See Feature Input.
summary_layer Required feature layer. Point, line, or polygon features that will be summarized for each polygon in the sum_within_layer. See Feature Input.
sum_shape

Optional boolean. A boolean value that instructs the task to calculate statistics based on shape type of the summary_layer, such as the length of lines or areas of polygons of the summary_layer within each polygon in sum_within_layer.

The default is True.

shape_units

Optional string. Specify units to summarize the length or areas when sum_shape is set to true. Units is not required to summarize points.

When summary_layer contains polygons: [‘Acres’, ‘Hectares’, ‘SquareMeters’, ‘SquareKilometers’, ‘SquareMiles’, ‘SquareYards’, ‘SquareFeet’]

When summary_layer contains lines: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’, ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’]

summary_fields

Optional list of strings. A list of field names and statistical summary type that you wish to calculate for all features in the summary_layer that are within each polygon in the sum_within_layer .

Example: [“fieldname1 summary”, “fieldname2 summary”]

group_by_field Optional string. This is a field of the summary_layer features that you can use to calculate statistics separately for each unique attribute value. For example, suppose the sum_within_layer contains city boundaries and the summary_layer features are parcels. One of the fields of the parcels is Status which contains two values: VACANT and OCCUPIED. To calculate the total area of vacant and occupied parcels within the boundaries of cities, use Status as the group_by_field field.
minority_majority

Optional boolean. This boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If true, the minority (least dominant) or the majority (most dominant) attribute values for each group field are calculated. Two new fields are added to the result_layer prefixed with Majority_ and Minority_.

The default is False.

percent_shape

Optional boolean. This Boolean parameter is applicable only when a group_by_field is specified. If set to true, the percentage of each unique group_by_field value is calculated for each sum_within_layer polygon.

The default is False.

output_name Optional string. If provided, the method will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the method will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For summarize_within, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those features in the sum_within_layer and the Summary_layer that intersect the bounding box will be summarized.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:Item if output_name is set. else results in a Python dict with the following keys:

dict with the following keys:

”result_layer” : layer (FeatureCollection)

”group_by_summary” : layer (FeatureCollection)

# USAGE EXAMPLE: To summarize traffic accidents within each county and group them by the day of accident. 
acc_within_county = summarize_within(sum_within_layer=boundaries,
                                     summary_layer=collision_lyr,
                                     sum_shape=True,
                                     group_by_field='Day',
                                     minority_majority=True,
                                     percent_shape=True,
                                     output_name='summarize accidents within each county',
                                     context={"extent":{"xmin":-13160690.837046918,"ymin":4041586.5461609075,"xmax":-13132466.464352652,"ymax":4058001.397985127,"spatialReference":{"wkid":102100,"latestWkid":3857}}})           

trace_downstream

arcgis.features.analysis.trace_downstream(input_layer, split_distance=None, split_units='Kilometers', max_distance=None, max_distance_units='Kilometers', bounding_polygon_layer=None, source_database=None, generalize=True, output_name=None, context=None, gis=None, estimate=False)
_images/trace_downstream.png

The trace_downstream method determines the trace, or flow path, in a downstream direction from the points in your analysis layer.

For example, suppose you have point features representing sources of contamination and you want to determine where in your study area the contamination will flow. You can use trace_downstream to identify the path the contamination will take. This trace can also be divided into individual line segments by specifying a distance value and units. The line being returned can be the total length of the flow path, a specified maximum trace length, or clipped to area features such as your study area. In many cases, if the total length of the trace path is returned, it will be from the source all the way to the ocean.

Argument Description
input_layer Required feature layer. The point features used for the starting location of a downstream trace. See Feature Input.
split_distance Optional float. The trace line will be split into multiple lines where each line is of the specified length. The resulting trace will have multiple line segments, each with fields FromDistance and ToDistance.
split_units

Optional string. The units used to specify split distance.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’ ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’].

The default is ‘Kilometers’.

max_distance Optional float. Determines the total length of the line that will be returned. If you provide a bounding_polygon_layer to clip the trace, the result will be clipped to the features in bounding_polygon_layer, regardless of the distance you enter here.
max_distance_units

Optional string. The units used to specify maximum distance.

Choice list: [‘Meters’, ‘Kilometers’, ‘Feet’ ‘Yards’, ‘Miles’].

The default is ‘Kilometers’.

bounding_polygon_layer Optional feature layer. A polygon layer specifying the area(s) where you want the trace downstreams to be calculated in. For example, if you only want to calculate the trace downstream with in a county polygon, provide a layer containing the county polygon and the resulting trace lines will be clipped to the county boundary. See Feature Input.
source_database

Optional string. Keyword indicating the data source resolution that will be used in the analysis.

Choice list: [‘Finest’, ‘30m’, ‘90m’].

  • Finest: Finest resolution available at each location from all possible data sources.
  • 30m: The hydrologic source was built from 1 arc second - approximately 30 meter resolution, elevation data.
  • 90m: The hydrologic source was built from 3 arc second - approximately 90 meter resolution, elevation data.

The default is ‘Finest’.

generalize Optional boolean. Determines if the output trace downstream lines will be smoothed into simpler lines or conform to the cell edges of the original DEM.
output_name Optional string. If provided, the task will create a feature service of the results. You define the name of the service. If output_name is not supplied, the task will return a feature collection.
context

Optional string. Context contains additional settings that affect task execution. For trace_downstream, there are two settings.

  1. Extent (extent)—a bounding box that defines the analysis area. Only those points in the input_layer that intersect the bounding box will have a downstream trace generated.
  2. Output Spatial Reference (outSR)—the output features will be projected into the output spatial reference.
estimate Optional boolean. If True, the number of credits to run the operation will be returned.
Returns:feature layer collection if output_name is set, else feature collection.
# USAGE EXAMPLE: To identify the path the water contamination  will take.
path = trace_downstream(input_layer=water_source_lyr,
                        split_distance=2,
                        split_units='Miles',
                        max_distance=2,
                        max_distance_units='Miles',
                        source_database='Finest',
                        generalize=True,
                        output_name='trace downstream')